In Plymouth, U.K, movie watches you (and changes endings depending on your reaction)

many worlds

Our mobile editor Jeff Van Camp loves to watch movies more than once in theaters if he really likes it. It kinda makes sense… maybe there’s a scene he missed the first time, or portions of the film so mystifying, he had to see them again to decode. If Jeff happened to be in Plymouth, U.K. in the next few days, he’s going to want to watch Many Worlds at least four times. That’s because this movie has an alternate ending for every viewing, and decides between its four endings based on how the audience reacts during the screening. 

The 15-minute short film is described as a “bizarre physics experiment.” Before the film airs, four volunteer audience members will be strapped with small sensors to help measure their heart rate, muscle tension, brainwave activity, and how much they’re sweating. These data help the movie identify the interactivity level and mood so the film can select upcoming scenes accordingly. For example, if the audience members are feeling restless, the movie may insert intense, slow music to induce fear. Alternatively, if the screeners are bored, an exciting action sequence may appear to keep their attention. It’s basically a Choose Your Own Adventure-type film, except all the choosing magically appears according to the way your body reacts.

The film’s inspiration came after director Alexis Kirke said movies often test differently depending on audience in various countries. Since movies cannot be altered after they’re released, he had to figure out a way for the movie to adapt to its audience without having them physically do anything during the screening.

“How often do studios test multiple cuts of a film when early cuts fail? Or worst of all: they release a film into the general public to have half the cinema goers find it boring or unsatisfying,” Kirke says. “It would be great if the film plot or character could change if we were finding them boring … that’s exactly what Many Worlds does.”

Many Worlds will premiere at the Peninsula Arts Contemporary Music Festival on February 23. In case you were curious, the plot revolves around a physics student who traps herself in a “coffin-sized box” with a cyanide gas-capsule connected to a Geiger counter. Two friends find this girl, and… well, the rest, I guess, is up to what you think should happen. Will the two friends help her? Jump in? Kill her? You’ll have to watch to find out all four endings.

Emerging Tech

Ekster 3.0 lets you ask, ‘Alexa, where did I leave my wallet?’

Ekster's newest smart wallet is its best yet. It's slimmer than ever, boasts a neat card-dispensing mechanism, and will even let you know where it is, thanks to smart speaker integration.
Home Theater

The best movies on Netflix in October, from 'The Witch’ to ‘Black Panther’

Save yourself from hours wasted scrolling through Netflix's massive library by checking out our picks for the streamer's best movies available right now, whether you're into explosive action, subdued humor, or anything in between.
Movies & TV

Title logo for 'John Wick 3' makes its debut during licensing show

The third installment of the wildly successful action series that stars Keanu Reeves as a deadly assassin forced out of retirement, John Wick 3: Parabellum, hits theaters in May 2019. Here's everything we know about the movie so far.
Movies & TV

The best movies on Amazon Prime right now (October 2018)

Prime Video provides subscribers with access to a host of fantastic films, but sorting through the catalog can be an undertaking. Luckily, we've done the work for you. Here are the best movies on Amazon Prime Video right now.
Movies & TV

Out of movies to binge? Our staff picks the best flicks on Hulu right now

From classics to blockbusters, Hulu offers some great films to its subscribers. Check out the best movies on Hulu, whether you're into charming adventure tales or gruesome horror stories.
Emerging Tech

Johns Hopkins’ lab-grown human retina could lead to big insights

Scientists from Johns Hopkins University have successfully grown human retina tissue from scratch in a lab. The work could help with the development of new therapeutics related to eye diseases.
Emerging Tech

Light-swallowing room promises Call of Duty fans the blackest of ops

What's it like to be in a room fully painted with the world's darkest material, Vantablack? The makers of one of the year's top video games teamed up with Vantablack scientists to find out.
Wearables

Skydio’s self-flying drone now has an Apple Watch app for flight prep

Skydio's clever R1 autonomous drone now has its own Apple Watch app, making flight preparations simpler than ever. The $2,000 flying machine is now also selling at its first retail outlet — Apple Stores in North America.
Emerging Tech

Are e-cigarettes safe? Here’s what the most recent science says

Ecigarettes are widely regarded and advertised as a healthier alternative to cigarettes for people who are trying to kick the smoking habit. How safe are these cigarette alternatives? We went deep into the recent scientific literature to…
Emerging Tech

Scientists created a condom that self-lubricates during sex. You’re welcome

Researchers from Boston University have invented a special coating for condoms which make them respond to bodily fluids by becoming more slippery. Here's how their new breakthrough works.
Emerging Tech

You’re so vein: Palm-based biometric system could help confirm your identity

Move over, Face ID! The next biometric security systems could rely on analyzing the unique vein patterns in your palm print. Here are some of the ways the technology could prove useful.
Emerging Tech

For only $4,950, you can get jetpack lessons from the world’s only instructor

Have you ever dreamed of flying using a jetpack? JetPack Aviation founder -- and the world's only qualified jetpack teacher -- David Mayman is now offering a day of flight instruction.
Emerging Tech

Biologists have found a hormone that could make space farming possible

Researchers have shown how space farming may be possible. By encouraging plants to excrete a certain hormone, they’ve demonstrated that crops can thrive despite challenging conditions, such as low-nutrient soil and microgravity.
Emerging Tech

Keep your holiday gift list high tech and under budget with these gadgets

Modern technology doesn't always come cheap, but there plenty of premium devices that don't carry a premium price. Whether you're looking for a streaming device or a means of capturing photos from above, our list of the best tech under $50…