Skip to main content

These floating trash cans suck up ocean garbage

Seabin wants to clean the world’s ocean and has a novel solution to do it. As the (oddly silent) video above demonstrates, the team has created a floating garbage can that automatically collects rubbish, fuel, detergents and other debris from the surrounding water. The Seabin is designed to sit near the floating docks of marinas, harbors yacht clubs, and other similar aquatic locations. Seabin is focusing on these areas because the heavy boat traffic and prevailing winds and currents cause debris to collect in these areas. They also are relatively calm waterways when compared the storminess of the open ocean.

The floating bins are connected via pipes to a shore-based water pump that pulls water through the bin. Water flows through the container, where a natural fiber bag is used to collect the debris that is present in the water. After the waste is filtered out, the water flows through the pump system where it can be cleaned even further using a water/oil separator. After processing, the water then is pumped back into the ocean. The Seabin works 24/7, collecting debris in the bag and holding it near the bin when it is full. It is sized so one operator can scoop the floating debris and change the bag without assistance.

Seabin hopes its technology will supplant existing trash collection methods that use individual workers who manually remove waste from corners, and trash boats that use nets to scoop up debris as they trawl a harbor. Though both methods are helpful, they are not as efficient as the autonomous Seabin. Trash boats are expensive to operate, and individual workers have not been able to keep up with the volume of garbage.

Seabin has a working prototype and has turned to Indiegogo to raise funds that’ll allow the team to begin production. If they raise the required $230,000, Seabin hopes to begin production in early 2016 with a delivery date of November 2016.

Editors' Recommendations

Kelly Hodgkins
Kelly's been writing online for ten years, working at Gizmodo, TUAW, and BGR among others. Living near the White Mountains of…
Forget ice — this cooler harnesses the power of the sun to chill your food
gosun chill cooler chilldisplay 03

GoSun Chill Solar Cooler

A few years ago, the Coolest Cooler burst onto Kickstarter and quickly raked in more than $13 million to bring it to market. While lengthy delays turned into a controversial project, a new type of cooler just landed on a crowdfunding platform with its own goal of reinventing the humble food and drink chiller. And this one promises to be with customers in just a few months.

Read more
Digital Trends’ Top Tech of CES 2023 Awards
Best of CES 2023 Awards Our Top Tech from the Show Feature

Let there be no doubt: CES isn’t just alive in 2023; it’s thriving. Take one glance at the taxi gridlock outside the Las Vegas Convention Center and it’s evident that two quiet COVID years didn’t kill the world’s desire for an overcrowded in-person tech extravaganza -- they just built up a ravenous demand.

From VR to AI, eVTOLs and QD-OLED, the acronyms were flying and fresh technologies populated every corner of the show floor, and even the parking lot. So naturally, we poked, prodded, and tried on everything we could. They weren’t all revolutionary. But they didn’t have to be. We’ve watched enough waves of “game-changing” technologies that never quite arrive to know that sometimes it’s the little tweaks that really count.

Read more
Digital Trends’ Tech For Change CES 2023 Awards
Digital Trends CES 2023 Tech For Change Award Winners Feature

CES is more than just a neon-drenched show-and-tell session for the world’s biggest tech manufacturers. More and more, it’s also a place where companies showcase innovations that could truly make the world a better place — and at CES 2023, this type of tech was on full display. We saw everything from accessibility-minded PS5 controllers to pedal-powered smart desks. But of all the amazing innovations on display this year, these three impressed us the most:

Samsung's Relumino Mode
Across the globe, roughly 300 million people suffer from moderate to severe vision loss, and generally speaking, most TVs don’t take that into account. So in an effort to make television more accessible and enjoyable for those millions of people suffering from impaired vision, Samsung is adding a new picture mode to many of its new TVs.
[CES 2023] Relumino Mode: Innovation for every need | Samsung
Relumino Mode, as it’s called, works by adding a bunch of different visual filters to the picture simultaneously. Outlines of people and objects on screen are highlighted, the contrast and brightness of the overall picture are cranked up, and extra sharpness is applied to everything. The resulting video would likely look strange to people with normal vision, but for folks with low vision, it should look clearer and closer to "normal" than it otherwise would.
Excitingly, since Relumino Mode is ultimately just a clever software trick, this technology could theoretically be pushed out via a software update and installed on millions of existing Samsung TVs -- not just new and recently purchased ones.

Read more