Tesla Roadster pictures: Get your car porn right here

Only Tesla CEO Elon Musk could somehow manage to upstage an electric semi truck with a 500 mile per charge range — and yesterday Musk did just that.

On November 16 in Hawthorne, California, Musk finally revealed the much-anticipated 1,000-horsepower Tesla Semi — but the faster, more powerful second-generation Roadster stole the show. Unfortunately, the latest and greatest Roadster isn’t set to hit the market until 2020 (barring any manufacturing delays). That said, these drool-worthy Tesla Roadster photos should whet your whistle in the interim.

The first iteration of the Tesla Roadster rolled out in 2005 when car manufacturer Lotus agreed to sell Tesla Elise shells. Tesla then equipped said shells with electric motors and lithium-ion battery cells. Soon after, the electric vehicle was capable of traveling more than 200 miles on a single charge, making it the first all-electric car to do so. And with a 3.9 second 0 to 60 mph time, this efficient vehicle packed some serious acceleration to boot. The latest Roadster makes those remarkable statistics seem laughable.

The new all-wheel drive Roadster boasts a 200kWh battery pack and can blast from 0 to 60 mph in 1.9 seconds. Similarly, the model has a 4.2 second 0 to 100 mph time, and conquered the quarter-mile in 8.9 seconds. (Here’s how it stacks up against the competition.) Although these numbers are all unconfirmed, they’ll be record-shattering if they hold up under independent analysis.

During Thursday’s unveiling Musk also stated that the latest Roadster is more than capable of reaching a top speed of 250 mph. Musk himself even spoke a little point-blank smack squarely at the traditional combustion engine auto industry: “The point of all this is just to give a hardcore smackdown to gasoline cars.”

On the inside, the Roaster will accommodate four passengers, and if the mood to go convertible strikes, the removable glass roof fits in the trunk. While the electric car charging infrastructure is still in its infancy — the best electric cars are few and far between — the Tesla packs a massive 620 mile per charge capacity to shore up any qualms whatsoever about range.

Unlike the affordable Tesla Model 3, the Roadster will come with a slightly heftier price tag. Currently, the base model Roadster will cost $200,000 with a necessary $50,000 deposit required upfront. It is important to note that the first 1,000 models — known as the oh-so exclusive Founder’s Series — will require the full $250,000 upfront.

But it’s worth it for this beauty, right?

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