Skip to main content

August rush: Playdead's creepy 'Inside' hits PlayStation 4 this month

Inside, developer Playdead’s critically acclaimed follow-up to the 2010 platformer Limbo, is about to reach a brand new audience. After a month of Xbox and PC exclusivity, the game will make its way to PlayStation 4.

The news comes with a new PlayStation 4 trailer, which highlights the perfect scores the game has received so far from outlets like IGN, Giant Bomb, and USGamer. In our review, we called Inside “a testament to expert artists and technicians, willing to set aside a relentless pursuit of bigger and newer and instead deliver a nearly perfect, refined little game.”

The official announcement comes just a day after it was discovered that the game’s trophy list was online for PlayStation 4. The game doesn’t appear to function any differently on the system (its simple two-button control scheme makes porting an easier process) but Inside is curiously absent from another Sony system: the PlayStation Vita. While nowhere close to the power of current-gen home consoles, the Vita was more than capable of running Limbo, and it was even offered as a PlayStation Plus free game in 2014.

It’s best to experience Inside‘s murky, creepy, and ambiguous story with as little information as possible, but if you were a fan of the studio’s previous game, there’s a very good chance you’ll enjoy Inside, as well. It innovates and builds on core platforming mechanics in a way we haven’t seen before, and its art direction, while perhaps not as immediately “iconic” as Limbo, serves the game’s somber setting and tone perfectly. Feel free to read up on the game’s trophies, too. They’re all related to collectible items, and the descriptions for each are intentionally vague.

Inside is currently available on Xbox One and PC, and will be released for PlayStation 4 on August 23. We’ll be crossing our fingers for a Vita version eventually.

Editors' Recommendations

Gabe Gurwin
Former Digital Trends Contributor
Gabe Gurwin has been playing games since 1997, beginning with the N64 and the Super Nintendo. He began his journalism career…
PlayStation has a secret weapon up its sleeve: the Hero Project
Three colorful PS5s float together in a line.

The video game industry is changing. As financial growth stagnates, companies like PlayStation have experimented with ways to adapt as markets and trends change. Where it was once able to rely on its first-party blockbusters to build and maintain an audience, it is looking more likely that it will need to invest in new strategies to prepare for the ways the industry is shifting. We see this with a bigger push into live-service and mobile games, but there's another initiative that isn't going to pay dividends in the near future but could set the groundwork for future success: the Hero Project.

Sony's Hero Project isn't a widely publicized or highlighted initiative -- even by PlayStation. Still, it's something every PlayStation owner should be aware of. It has the potential to be its secret weapon in the long run.
The world needs heroes
PlayStation's Hero Project is currently in its fourth iteration. Beginning in 2016, it kicked off with three rounds of the China Hero Project and has currently expanded to include the India Hero Project. The goal of these initiatives is to allow game developers from said countries to pitch their games directly to a special PlayStation committee. If accepted, Sony will then offer the team support with finances, technologies, marketing, and occasionally publishing.

Read more
PlayStation Portal 2: 8 features we want in Sony’s next-gen handheld
A PlayStation Portal boots up.

After the PlayStation Portable and PlayStation Vita, there wasn't much hope that Sony would create another handheld system. Both consoles failed to establish themselves as meaningful parts of PlayStation's ecosystems despite having passionate fan bases. That's what made the initial reveal of the PlayStation Portal so surprising, at least until we knew exactly what it was. As an accessory, the PlayStation Portal is a decent device for some situations. It makes remote play easy and combines all the cool features of the DualSense controller with a great display. However, it does leave a lot to be desired for those hoping for a bit more from a new PlayStation device. Should Sony decide to iterate on this novel idea, there are a few features we think it needs to have to be a true success.

We're not going to ask Sony to completely overhaul what it established with the PlayStation Portal.  For as much as we'd love for a fully dedicated handheld like a Vita 2, that's just too far beyond what we can hope for.
Wi-Fi 6

Read more
I was a PlayStation Portal hater. Now it’s one of my go-to gaming devices
A PlayStation Portal plays Marvel's Spider-Man 2.

In November, I reviewed the PlayStation Portal. I was mixed on Sony’s streaming handheld at the time, frustrated with a corner-cutting execution of a good idea. It seemed like a poor value compared to simply slapping a cheaper Backbone controller on a phone. As is often the case with tech reviews, though, I only had a short window to test it out where I was more focused on the more objective side of what the Portal does and doesn’t do. Would my feelings change when I was using it naturally?

I’ve gotten the answer to that question over the past few months. While I barely touched my Portal after reviewing it in 2023, it’s quickly become a go-to device in my home as of January. I’m now breaking it out at least once a week, finding some practical use cases for it. Though my overall assessment of it hasn’t changed, I have a more tangible understanding of where it can be a useful -- if superfluous -- PS5 companion. It’s a needless luxury, but one that I’m finding that I'm happy to indulge in.
Second screen
The PlayStation Portal’s launch just so happened to come right before a major life change that would shift my perspective. After living alone for three years, my girlfriend moved into my apartment last December. It’s been a natural change that’s working great so far. That shift does come with some lifestyle changes, though. We’re both crammed into a one-bedroom apartment, which means we’re sharing a tight space. We remotely do our jobs feet apart in the same room, and most evenings are spent lounging on the couch.

Read more