Set goals and limits for your kid’s Fire tablet with Amazon’s parental controls

Amazon Fire Parental Controls
Simon Hill/Digital Trends
Tablets can be great devices for kids. They can play games, watch movies, read books, and a whole lot more, but you need to be able to protect them from questionable content. The best kids’ tablet you can buy right now is the Fire HD 8 Kids Edition. One of the reasons that it’s our top pick is Amazon boasts one of the most comprehensive sets of parental controls available.

Amazon’s parental controls work on any Amazon Fire tablet, so whether you have one of the Kids Edition tablets, a Fire HD 10, or an older Fire tablet, you can still use these controls. In this guide, we’re going to run through how to set up parental controls on your Fire tablet and highlight some of the key features you’ll want to take advantage of.

How to set up parental controls on a Fire tablet

We’ll assume that you’ve created your own profile and signed into your Amazon account on the Fire tablet in question. If you haven’t then go to Settings > My Account and do so. Now, there are two ways to restrict access on your tablet. This first method is easier and quicker, but we recommend you skip ahead to the second, because it’s a lot more versatile.

Using simple parental controls

  • You can go to Settings > Parental Controls and toggle it on.
  • You’ll have to enter a password. Make sure it’s not something your child could guess.
  • By default, this will block Alexa, the web browser, email, contact, calendars, and the camera.
  • It will also password protect purchases and videos, and block social sharing.
  • You can also toggle on Set Restricted Access and choose hours when the tablet should be inaccessible without your password.

Using Amazon’s FreeTime and multiple profiles

Instead of using the simple parental controls, we recommend creating Child Profiles. You can create multiple profiles to be used across devices and get some help from Amazon restricting content. If you didn’t choose a lock screen PIN or password when you first set your Fire tablet up, then you must start there. This will block your child from accessing your profile or the parental controls menu.

  • Go to Settings > Security > Lock-Screen Passcode and toggle it on.
  • Choose a password or PIN that you’ll remember, but make sure that it’s not something your child could easily guess.
  • Now it’s time to set up a profile for your child. Go to Settings > Profiles & Family Library and tap Add a Child Profile.
  • You’ll have to enter a name, gender, and birthdate.
  • For children under nine, it’s best to select Use Amazon FreeTime (it’s called Fire for Kids in the U.K.) There is also a Teen Profiles option, recommended for kids aged nine and older.
  • Once the profile has been created, you’ll get to choose the apps, games, books, and videos from your content library, that you want to allow them to access. As a shortcut, Amazon provides an option to Add all kids’ titles. These are chosen based on the age you entered during the profile creation.
  • Repeat the process to add as many other child profiles as you need.

When you want to select a profile, you simply swipe down from the top of the screen and tap the profile icon at the top right. When you choose a child’s profile, you’ll see that the interface changes, and there’s a carousel containing the content you allowed on a blue background. If you choose an adult profile, you’ll be prompted to enter a PIN or password.

You have now restricted access to certain apps, and chosen the content you want your kids to be able to use. Amazon FreeTime blocks content purchases and in-app purchases by default. It also disables location-based services and social sharing, and it locks the tablet to landscape orientation. But there’s a lot more that you can do.

Managing your child’s profile

There are lots of options in each child profile to give you fine control over precisely what they can and can’t do. Let’s run through the main things quickly:

Go to Settings > Profiles & Family Library and choose the child profile you want to manage.

Tap Set Daily Goals & Time Limits and you’ll find that you can prevent your child from being able to use the tablet during the night, set Total Screen Time limits, or break down your restrictions by content type. For example, some parents might be happy to allow unlimited reading, but want to restrict apps and games to half an hour per day. When the time limit is reached, a message pops up onscreen to tell your child that they’ve reached the limit for the day. You can also set different schedules and limits for the weekend than for weekdays. You can even set Educational Goals, stipulating, for example, that your child must read a book for half an hour before they can access entertainment content.

If you want to add or remove access to any specific content, then you can do so under Manage Your Child’s Content. To download a new app or game for them, you’ll need to log into your profile, download and install the app, and then go to Settings > Profiles & Family Library, choose their profile, then tap Add Content > Add Books, Videos and Apps, tap the app or game you want to add, and then tap Done. You can override the age-appropriate suggestions and grant access to whatever content you want in here.

Under Web Settings in your child’s profile, you can choose whether to allow access to the web browser. You can also limit web content to Amazon Curated Content, which has been pre-approved based on your child’s age.

You also have the option to restrict camera and gallery access in your child’s profile. They won’t be able to send any photos they take via email, or upload them to social media, but you can choose to automatically back them up to Amazon Drive if you want to.

Now that you’ve set up your profiles and configured them, you can relax, safe in the knowledge that your kids can’t overdose on games or access anything you don’t want them to see. However, they will still have to come and pester you when they want a new game or book. If you want to grant them access to new content that has been filtered and is age-appropriate, then you need to consider Amazon FreeTime Unlimited.

Business

Apple banned from distributing some iPhone models in Germany

Apple is following the FTC's lead and has sued Qualcomm for a massive $1 billion in the U.S., $145 million in China, and also in the U.K., claiming the company charged onerous royalties for its patented tech.
Photography

Here are 8 GoPro tips to get the most out of your action cam

There's more to your GoPro camera than just mounting it to your skateboard. Whether it's finding the best accessories or understanding the settings more thoroughly, learn to shoot video like a pro with these simple GoPro tips and tricks.
Computing

Still miss Windows 7? Here's how to make Windows 10 look more like it

There's no simple way of switching on a Windows 7 mode in Windows 10. Instead, you can install third-party software, manually tweak settings, and edit the registry. We provide instructions for using these tweaks and tools.
Computing

Go hands-free in Windows 10 with speech-to-text support

Looking for the dictation, speech-to-text, and voice control options in Windows 10? Here's how to set up Speech Recognition in Windows 10 and use it to go hands-free in a variety of different tasks and applications within Windows.
Computing

Is your PC slow? Here's how to restore Windows 10 to factory settings

Computers rarely work as well after they accumulate files and misconfigure settings. Thankfully, with this guide, you'll be able to restore your PC to its original state by learning how to factory reset Windows.
Mobile

Here’s how to download podcasts and listen to them on Android or iOS

Podcasts have become a cultural staple. Here's how to download podcasts and listen to them on your Android or iOS device, and which apps to use if you're looking to get the most out of the format.
Emerging Tech

Awesome Tech You Can’t Buy Yet: camera with A.I. director, robot arm assistant

Check out our roundup of the best new crowdfunding projects and product announcements that hit the web this week. You may not be able to buy this stuff yet, but it sure is fun to gawk!
Mobile

Windows 10 Mobile is dead: Switch to iOS or Android, Microsoft says

A Microsoft support page detailed the company's plans to end support for Windows 10 Mobile in less than a year. Users with devices powered by the platform are suggested to switch to iOS or Android devices.
Mobile

How to use iOS 12’s Passwords and Accounts tool to autofill passwords

Keeping track of all your passwords and accounts can be a real chore. If you use an iPhone with iOS 12, then you don't have to. Here's how to use iOS 12's own password manager to autofill passwords.
Computing

What is fixed wireless 5G? Here’s everything you need to know

Here's fixed wireless 5G explained! Learn what you need to know about this effective new wireless technology, when it's available, how much it costs, and more. If you're thinking about 5G, this guide can help!
Mobile

Razer’s Wireless Charger will turn your desk into gamer heaven

The Razer Wireless Charger adds colorful flair to your desk or bedside table. It works with any phone that supports Qi wireless charging -- with some quirks -- but is it worth the high price tag? We take a look.
Gaming

Xbox app lets you access your console while away from home. Here's how

Microsoft's Xbox allows you to access your profile information and launch media content directly from your mobile device. Check out our quick guide on how to connect your smartphone to an Xbox One.
Wearables

The best Apple Watch bands and straps to stylize your timepiece

If you have an Apple Watch, you know how easy it is to take off the strap it came with, so why not buy yourself another one? Here, we've gathered the best Apple Watch bands we've seen so far. There's something for everyone.
Mobile

How to choose an iPad in 2019: A practical guide to Apple’s tablets

Selecting an iPad from Apple's lineup can be intimidating, but it doesn't have to be. Our comprehensive guide should put the numbers and specs in practical, easy-to-understand terms. Find your ideal iPad with the help of our guide.
1 of 2