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Hit the road: Google is officially ending support for Trips on August 5

Google Trips has long been a great way to plan a trip and do research for things to do in your destination, but unfortunately, the app looks to be on the way out. Google has announced that it will be shutting down Google Trips, and is encouraging users to instead look for the features in Google Trips in other apps.

It’s not all that surprising that Google would shut down Google Trips, especially considering the fact that the company recently launched another travel service at google.com/travel. Not only that, but the company has also been updating Google Maps with great travel and discovery features, so users will be able to turn to Maps to find things to do. Still, having to use the Trips website isn’t the same as using a native app, so hopefully Google will release an app for the new Trips website at some point in the near future.

Google has announced August 5 as the official date for the shutdown of Trips, noting that until then you’ll still be able to access trip reservations and notes as you normally would. Between now and then, however, it’s worth finding another app and making sure there’s no important data in the app that you don’t want to lose. That said, Google says that the notes from Google Trips will be available at google.com/travel, and that you’ll be able to find your saved attractions, flights, and hotels in Search. You’ll also be able to find saved locations in Maps by heading to the menu and tapping the “Your Places” button, then tapping “Saved.”

Of course, there are plenty of other travel services out there that can help you plan trips and travel. Apps like Kayak, Hipmunk, and Packpoint can all be helpful in planning a trip — and are all featured in our guide of the best travel apps. Perhaps the most similar app to Google Trips is Kayak, which allows users to book flights, hotels, and more.

We’ll have to wait and see if the new Trips web service ends up getting another app, but considering the fact that Google wants to build out Trips’ features into other Google services, we’re betting that there won’t be one.

Christian de Looper
Christian’s interest in technology began as a child in Australia, when he stumbled upon a computer at a garage sale that he…
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