Twitter gets more emojis: Unicode’s latest batch of icons land on the social network

emoji
downloadsource.fr/Flickr
Twitter has become the first social platform to offer support for Unicode’s newest batch of emojis, all 72 of them.

The update has been rolled out just in time for World Emoji Day (yes, that’s an actual thing), which takes place on July 17. Among the new icons are the ROFL smiley, nauseated face, lying face, and the (downright creepy) clown face.

Aside from the new emojis, Twitter has also made some modifications to the appearance of existing icons. A number of human appearance emojis now support skin tone modifiers, these include the face palm, shrug, selfie, and man dancing. Elsewhere, additional dimensional details have been added to emojis that represent objects, making them appear less flat on the social network, according to Emojipedia.

The fact that Twitter has beaten most apps and services to incorporate Unicode version 9 emojis also makes them a tad bit harder to use in your tweets. Currently the only way to use them is to copy and paste them from online resources such as Emojipedia.

A selection of the new emojis supported by Twitter
A selection of the new emojis supported by Twitter

Additionally, seeing as they are not yet supported by iOS and Android, Twitter app users won’t see them on the mobile version of the service, instead the emojis may appear as a question mark box. You can view the comprehensive list of new emojis supported by Twitter here.

You may want to be careful in how you apply them, however, as earlier this year Twitter announced that it will allow businesses to target ads based on the emojis people use in their tweets. Twitter claims that over 110 billion emojis have been tweeted since 2014.

Twitter’s unique emojis have also proven to be big business for the social network, with brands reportedly forking out seven-figure sums for the little hashtag-activated icons.

Social Media

New Zealand attack shows that as A.I. filters get smarter, so do violators

The shootings in Christchurch, New Zealand were livestreamed to social media, and while stats show networks are improving at removing offending videos, as the system improves, so do the violators' workarounds.
Computing

Confused about RSS? Don't be. Here's what it is and how to use it

What is an RSS feed, anyway? This traditional method of following online news is still plenty useful. Let's take a look at what RSS means, and what advantages it has in today's busy world.
Social Media

Twitter is testing a handy subscription feature for following threads

Twitter has recently started testing a feature that lets you subscribe to a thread so that you’ll no longer need to like a comment or post to it yourself in order to receive notifications of new contributions.
Computing

The Edge browser is dying. Here's what we know about its replacement

There's a new Microsoft Chromium browser coming, and it looks like it will be replacing Edge for most people. Here's everything you need to know about this new browser, how you can use it, and when it's expected to come out.
Social Media

Twitter takes a cue from Instagram and Snapchat with new quick-swipe camera

Twitter is giving the "what's happening" treatment to photos and video by allowing users to access the in-app camera fast enough to catch and share the moment. The new Twitter camera is now accessible with a swipe.
Social Media

Yep, it’s not just you. Facebook, Instagram, and WhatsApp are down for many

Facebook's family of apps has been suffering issues for much of the day. Instagram, WhatsApp, Facebook Messenger, and Facebook itself have been out of action for users around the world, with the company scrambling to sort it out.
Social Media

Facebook may soon let you watch live TV with friends in Watch Party

Facebook Watch Party is designed to allow friends to watch together, even when they can't be in the same physical space. Now, that feature could be expanding to include live TV. Facebook announced a test of the feature, starting with live…
Social Media

Federal investigation digs into Facebook’s data-sharing deals

Facebook confirmed it is cooperating with a federal criminal investigation. According to a report, the company is under investigation for sharing user data with smartphone and tablet companies.
Social Media

Facebook explains its worst outage as 3 million users head to Telegram

Facebook, if you didn't already know it, suffered a bit of an issue on Wednesday, March 13. An issue that took down not only its social networking site, but also Instagram, WhatsApp, and Messenger. On Thursday it offered an explanation.
Gaming

Snapchat could soon let you play games in between your selfies

If a new report is accurate, Snapchat will be getting an integrated gaming platform in April. The platform will feature mobile games form third-party developers, and one publisher is already signed on.
Social Media

Your Google+ public content will remain viewable on the web, if you want it to

Google's failed social network — Google+ — will soon be wiped from the internet, but there's a team of volunteers working right now to save its public content for the Internet Archive.
Computing

There’s more space on MySpace after ‘accidental’ wipe of 50 million songs

MySpace is no longer a safe refuge for music and media produced in the 2000s. It said that almost any artistic content uploaded to the site between 2003 and 2015 may have been lost as part of a server migration last year.
Computing

Intel and Facebook team up to give Cooper Lake an artificial intelligence boost

Intel's upcoming Cooper Lake microarchitecture will be getting a boost when it comes to artificial intelligence processes, thanks to a partnership with Facebook. The results are CPUs that are able to work faster.
Photography

Insta-checkout? New Instagram service lets you shop without leaving the platform

Shopping on Instagram no longer means leaving the platform to checkout in a web browser. Instagram checkout launched in beta today with a handful of retailers, allowing users to checkout without leaving the app.