Skip to main content

How to watch the total lunar eclipse this week

A few weeks ago a partial solar eclipse was visible across parts of Europe, Africa, and Asia, and now it’s the turn of North America, South America, and Australasia to enjoy a spectacle of the skies. This week will see a total lunar eclipse visible in parts of these regions, giving you the last chance to catch a total lunar eclipse until 2025.

If you’re up for a spot of stargazing, we have details on how to watch the eclipse below.

What to expect from the lunar eclipse

The Flower Moon lunar eclipse over NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans is shown from the initial partial eclipse to totality in a composite of seven images shot on Sunday, May 15, 2022.
The Flower Moon lunar eclipse over NASA’s Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans is shown from the initial partial eclipse to totality in a composite of seven images shot on Sunday, May 15, 2022. NASA/Michael DeMocker

A lunar eclipse happens when the Earth is directly in between the sun and the moon. That means that the light coming from the sun gets blocked by the Earth, casting the moon in shadow. As the shadow moves across the moon it creates a dark shape called an umbra, where light is completely blocked, and also an area called the penumbra where light is partially blocked.

This has some fascinating effects on how the moon appears in the sky. You’ll be able to see more stars which are located close to the moon because they aren’t blocked out by its glare, and the moon will appear red because of the refraction of light passing through Earth’s atmosphere. According to Sky & Telescope, this is also a great time for looking out for planets like Uranus which may be visible if you have binoculars, because it is at its closest and brightest around the night of the eclipse.

You may even catch some meteors whizzing by which will be more visible with less light from the moon.

How to watch the lunar eclipse

A nearly total eclipse of November’s full “Beaver Moon” captured over the city of New Orleans before dawn on Nov. 19, 2021. The 97% eclipse clocked in at 3 hours, 28 minutes, and 24 seconds, making it the longest partial lunar eclipse in 580 years.
A nearly total eclipse of November’s full “Beaver Moon” captured over the city of New Orleans before dawn on Nov. 19, 2021. The 97% eclipse clocked in at 3 hours, 28 minutes, and 24 seconds, making it the longest partial lunar eclipse in 580 years. NASA/Michoud Assembly Facility

The lunar eclipse will occur on Tuesday, November 8, and will be visible in Northern America in the early morning, weather permitting. Later in the day it will be visible in South America, then in the early evening it will be visible in parts of Asia and then Australasia. For details of what parts of the event will be visible in what time zones, check out Sky & Telescope’s table showing viewing times.

You don’t need any special equipment to view the lunar eclipse, though if you have binoculars or a telescope this is a great excuse to make use of them. Wrap up warm and head to an area with as little light around you as possible for the best view of the skies.

Editors' Recommendations

Georgina Torbet
Georgina is the Digital Trends space writer, covering human space exploration, planetary science, and cosmology. She…
How to photograph April’s solar eclipse, according to NASA
A total solar eclipse.

How to Photograph a Total Solar Eclipse

Nikon recently shared some tips on photographing April’s total solar eclipse, and NASA is also offering its own ideas.

Read more
How to photograph April’s solar eclipse, according to Nikon
A total solar eclipse.

Solar Eclipse Photography Tips from Nikon | Best Camera Settings | 2024 Solar Eclipse Guide

Excitement is building for next month’s total solar eclipse that will see the moon’s shadow fall across a large part of the U.S., from Maine in the northeast all the way to Texas in the south.

Read more
How to watch three crew members launch to the ISS on Thursday
NASA astronaut Tracy C. Dyson, Roscosmos cosmonaut Oleg Novitskiy, and spaceflight participant Marina Vasilevskaya of Belarus pose for a portrait at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center on Nov. 2, 2023.

This Thursday will see the launch of one NASA astronaut and two other crew members to the International Space Station (ISS), traveling on a Russian Soyuz vehicle. The crew includes a Russian cosmonaut and the first Belarusian in space.

NASA Astronaut Tracy Dyson Launch to the Space Station

Read more