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How to make a video game (experience not required)

Creating a video game is a daunting task.

Big name developers like Bungie, Ubisoft, and Treyarch have budgets reaching into the millions, as well as a staff of designers and programmers working around the clock to bring the next blockbuster to your doorstep. It’s an incredibly bustling market, one that frequently brings in more revenue than movies, and propels video games into the mainstream consciousness without ever batting an eye. Of course, that’s just one face of the video game industry.

We’ve seen a virtual barrage of indie games for consoles and mobile platforms in recent years, as small studios — sometimes with just one or two people — create inventive, emotional projects that push the boundaries of what a “game” can be. Journey, the stunning adventure game for the PlayStation 3 from developer thatgamecompany, took home six out of 10 awards at the 2013 Game Developers Choice Awards in San Francisco. Other hit titles, like Bastion and Minecraft, continue to showcase just how powerful indie gaming has become in recent years.

However, this is article isn’t here to tout the success of others; it’s here to help you create a success of your own to tout. Making an innovative and groundbreaking game is just as difficult as creating a hit song, if not more. It requires a combination of hard work and innovation, a perhaps a dash of genius to boot. We are in no way suggesting that just anyone can sit down and make a game like Super Meat Boy or Limbo off the bat. However, making a playable game is not as insane as you might think; it just takes a little bit of time and patience. Here’s our quick guide on how to make a (very simple) video game. No experience necessary.

Note: I designed a little 8-bit game of my own, titled “The DT Express Quest,” on behalf of Digital Trends to go along with the article. I had no previous experience crafting video games, nor did I invest any money into making the project, but it’s a working video game I can write home about after a mere 10 hours of trial-and-error tinkering. Windows users can give it a whirl and help boost my self-esteem. There may be other ports down the line.

Give it try by clicking the download link below:

DT Express Quest
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