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Cyanogenmod will let you lock away your apps

Open source operating systems can gain a lot of traction when the community flourishes, and such is the case with Android. Sometimes the modified versions of an OS become more than just a hobby project, as is undoubtedly the case with CyanogenMod (CM). Originally built on Android code, the software has come along quite a bit since then. The team behind the modified build is now working on a way for you to lock away individual apps, as revealed by a post from the its official Google Plus page. The team also revealed that this feature will be included in an update (though no date has been given) to CM13, which was released about a month ago.

Once locked away, your apps will not run until you’ve validated your identity. Users can choose to designate a lock by methods of a password, PIN, pattern lock, or even fingerprint for phones that support it. Users can assign protected status to all applications, including system apps. Once an app has received “protected” status, it works throughout the entire system; you cannot gain backdoor access by opening your app via contextual link or by going through the Google Play store. Cyanogen Inc. employee Adnan Begovic shared a short video showcasing the feature.

Related: The $75 CyanogenMod-powered Yu Yunique easily gives the Moto E a run for its money

Phone privacy and security has gained traction in recent years. Governmental data breaches, playful friends, and overprotective lovers pose a constant threat to the files you’d rather keep private. While this system likely won’t protect your apps from insistent hackers, it should provide enough protection for when you pass out at a stranger’s party. Users are commonly limited to third-party applications to protect their privacy and apps, but with the addition of this feature, are less likely to rely on them.

It’s recommended to not store anything deemed “too dangerous” anywhere outside your own pocket. But in case you ever felt the need for protection like this, CyanogenMod aims to have you covered.