Skip to main content

It took years, but Chrome is officially the king of web browsers

reading list
aradaphotography/123RF
For a number of years now, most of the analysts that kept track of how popular certain browsers were, painted Chrome as the most popular of the bunch. There was one who disagreed however: NetMarketShare. For years, its combination of all versions of Internet Explorer trumped Chrome in its quarterly stats, but no more: Chrome is now the undisputed king.

In years gone past, this was far from the case. Internet Explorer dominated, with its latest version alone the most popular browser, while previous iterations had strong followings of their own, and Chrome and Firefox were small outliers. Now though, the landscape is far different.

Although it will depend on who or which z you ask, the general consensus is that Chrome is by far the most popular platform. To use NetMarketShare’s latest statistics however, Chrome comes in with a 41.66 percent share of the market, while Internet Explorer (all versions + Edge) has 41.35 percent.

Apple’s Safari has just under 5 percent.

After that, there is a huge drop-off, with Firefox achieving just 9.76 percent of the market. No wonder it’s considering using elements of Chrome’s core for its next-generation of browsers.

If we instead use NetMarketShare’s data to split the browsers by version though, the stats change dramatically. Chrome 49.0 has a 21.79 percent of the pie, making it easily the most popular. Internet Explorer 11 comes in at 19.87 percent, with versions 10 and 9.0 having 5.44 and 5.49 percent, respectively.

Perhaps most interesting though is that Microsoft’s Internet Explorer replacement, Edge, doesn’t have the support you might expect, since it comes installed as default in Windows 10. Edge has just 3.85 percent of the browsing audience.

In reality though, all of these statistics aren’t representative of the vast majority of web users, since they only cover desktop usage. Most people these days use the web through their smartphones, another arena in which Google’s Chrome browser dominates.

There, Chrome pulls in just shy of 50 percent of all web users, while Apple’s Safari is much more impressive than on desktop, with 29.33 percent.

Which browser do you use? Statistically, it’s probably Chrome.

Editors' Recommendations

Jon Martindale
Jon Martindale is the Evergreen Coordinator for Computing, overseeing a team of writers addressing all the latest how to…
Update your Google Chrome browser now: New exploit could leave you open to hacks
Google Chrome Stock Photo

If you’re a Google Chrome user, you should update the browser immediately. Google released a software update to the browser late yesterday evening that patches two zero-day vulnerabilities to the browser that could potentially allow the browser to be hijacked by hackers.
One of the vulnerabilities affects Chrome’s audio component (CVE-2019-13720) while the other resides in the PDFium (CVE-2019-13721) library.
Hackers can corrupt or modify the data in Chrome’s memory using the exploit, which will eventually give them access to the computer as a whole.
One of the exploits, CVE-2019-13720 has been discovered in the wild by researchers at Kaspersky.
Google says that the update to the browser will be rolling out to users automatically over the coming days and weeks.
That said, if you’re a Chrome user it would be more prudent for you to go ahead and do that update manually right now instead.
To make it happen you’ll want to launch Chrome on your computer and then click on “Chrome” in the menu bar followed by “About Chrome.” That will launch the Settings menu. From there,  click “About Chrome” at the bottom of the menu on the left. That will likely trigger an automatic update if yours hasn’t already happened. If it doesn’t, you’ll see a button to manually update the browser as well.
Once you update the browser you should be good to go without fear of the security threat becoming an issue. Last month many Mac users ran into issues with Google Chrome when it seemed to send computers into an endless reboot cycle.
An investigation by Mac enterprise and IT blog Mr. Macintosh found that the issue was actually a bug that deletes the symlink at the/var path on the Mac it’s running on, which essentially deletes a key in the MacOS system file.
That issue only impacted Macs where the System Integrity Protection (SIP) had been disabled. The issue particularly impacted older Macs that were made before SIP was introduced with OS X El Capitan in 2015.
All this comes as Google is gearing up to launch some major updates to Chrome, including one update that will change how you manage tabs using the browser. That update is expected to roll out later this year.

Read more
Chrome browser to add audio and video controls to address bar
The Google Chrome logo set against a rocky background image.

Google's Chrome browser will soon be getting a nifty feature: media controls which let you interact with currently playing videos from the address bar.

You can preview the feature in the Chrome nightly developer build, Canary version 77, where Google rolls out new experimental features. It is the most unstable of the four Chrome builds available (Stable, Beta, Dev, and Canary) and the place to get a glimpse of upcoming Chrome updates.

Read more
Intel road map explained: going beyond 2027
An Intel Meteor Lake processor socketed in a motherboard.

Intel revealed a new road map at its Intel Foundry Services (IFS) Direct event that will take the company into 2027. It's an extension of the road map Intel laid out nearly three years ago, shortly after Intel's CEO Pat Gelsinger took the reins of the company.

Although processor road maps aren't anything new, Intel has delivered on the cadence it laid out a few years ago. This updated road map shows what comes next as we approach the end of the original plan Gelsinger laid out. Keep in mind that Intel is focused on the process advancements here and not individual processors.
Meteor Lake and where we are now

Read more