WikiLeaks tome available on Amazon UK invites controversy; UPDATE: book is removed; SECOND UPDATE: author arrested

WikiLeaks documents expose US foreign policy conspiraciesEven though Amazon refuses to host WikiLeaks’ site, that doesn’t mean it has wiped itself free of everything tied to the whistleblowers. Amazon UK currently has an e-book available for Kindle purchase focusing on the fallout of Cablegate. It was believed earlier this morning that the document contained the entirety of the classified cables, but after further review, it appears that isn’t the case.

Author Heinz Duthel (also accountable for Julian Assange: The Whistleblower. Traitor or Hero? and Discovering Asian Women) is responsible for the addition to Amazon UK’s book store. It’s now available for the Kindle, and goes by the catchy title: Wikileaks documents expose US foreign policy conspiracies. All cables with tags from 1-5000 [DOES NOT CONTAIN TEXT OF CABLES].

We’re guessing Amazon added or required Duthel to add that last part in all caps, and there is now a message on the e-books page reading “This book contains commentary and analysis regarding recent WikiLeaks disclosures, not the original material disclosed via the WikiLeaks website.” However, media outlets were widely reporting the title without the end note this morning — and seeing as it originally states it does contain “all cables with tags from 1-5000,” it seems as if there’s been confusion as to the book’s actual content. That, or possibly some serious editing. Amazon’s taken a beating from the media this morning, and labeled a hypocrite for suspending the WikiLeaks site itself while hosting a book which, allegedly, contained the very same information. However it turns out the e-book may only be an examination of the dilemma.

Still, the description is inflammatory, and claims it reveals that “the US State Department and American diplomacy in general turn out to be a vast nest of spies.” But no direct text from the cables, aside to what was previously printed in The Guardian and The New York Times, appear to be included in the book.

The majority of the reviews are not kind, and generally critical of the online retailer’s decision to sell the book. It’s a familiar situation to Amazon, which last month found itself facing protest from customers for selling a guide for pedophiles. Amazon ultimately removed the book from its site.

Let’s also remember that Amazon is rumored to be targeted by Anonymous, the group protesting the banning of WikiLeaks and arrest of Julian Assange. The site may not want to attract their further wrath by removing the book, which puts the retailer in a difficult position.

Even if WikiLeaks documents expose US foreign policy conspiracies. All cables with tags from 1-5000 doesn’t not contain the infamous content itself, do you think Amazon is inviting controversy by selling the it?


[UPDATE]
It appears the author has pulled the book from the site himself. In an e-mail to PCMag, Amazon verified that it was not responsible for the book’s removal.


[SECOND UPDATE]
The author of the controversial book, Phillip Greaves, was arrested last week in Colorado on a Florida felony warrant after undercover detectives purchased the  book. He will now face obscenity charges in Florida. 

Computing

Microsoft’s Windows 10 updates have been a disaster despite safeguards

After a string of Windows 10 update issues, including severe data loss for a number of users, Microsoft's Corporate Vice President of Windows, Michael Fortin, has spoken out about quality control surrounding Windows development at…
Web

Google Translate updated to reduce gender bias in its translations

Google is changing how Google Translate offers translations. Previously when you entered a word like doctor, Translate would offer a masculine interpretation of the word. Now, Translate will offer both masculine and feminine versions.
Web

Google’s updated Santa Tracker entertains and teaches coding throughout December

Google's Santa Tracker is in its fifteenth year and is back again with even more features. You can have fun with more than 20 games, learn about different holiday traditions around the world, and enjoy some festive animations.
Digital Trends Live

Digital Trends Live: Alexa updates, Uber’s self-driving cars, and more

On this episode of Digital Trends Live, Senior Editor Caleb Denison discussed the best streaming devices and we welcomed Danny Pyell and Felia Mano, the Nintendo Power Couple, and Kelly Dachtler from OBVS to the show.
Cars

Best Products of 2018

Our reception desk has so many brown boxes stacked up, it looks like a loading dock. We’re on a first-name basis with the UPS guy. We get new dishwashers more frequently than most people get new shoes. What we’re trying to say is: We…
Computing

Windows 10 user activity logs are sent to Microsoft despite users opting out

Windows 10 Privacy settings may not be enough to stop PCs from releasing user activity data to Microsoft. Users discovered that opting out of having their data sent to Microsoft does little to prevent it from being released.
Computing

Intel's discrete graphics will be called 'Xe,' IGP gets Adapative Sync next year

Intel has officially dubbed its discrete graphics product Intel Xe, and the company also provided details about its Gen11 IGP. The latter will include adaptive sync support and will arrive in 2019.
Computing

Intel answers Qualcomm's new PC processors by pairing Core and Atom in 'Foveros'

Intel has announced a new packaging technology called 'Foveros' that makes it easier for the company to place multiple chips together on one package. That includes chips based on different Intel architectures, like Core and Atom.
Computing

Razer’s classic DeathAdder Elite gaming mouse drops to $40 on Amazon

If you're looking to pick up a new gaming mouse for the holidays, Amazon has you covered with this great deal on the classic Razer DeathAdder Elite gaming mouse with customizable buttons, RGB lighting, and a 16,000 DPI optical sensor.
Computing

Intel's dedicated GPU is not far off -- here's what we know

Did you hear? Intel is working on a dedicated graphics card. It's called Arctic Sound and though we don't know a lot about it, we know that Intel has some ex-AMD Radeon graphics engineers developing it.
Computing

Firefox 64 helps keep your numerous tabs under control

Mozilla officially launched Firefox 64 by placing new features into the laps of its users including new tab management abilities, intelligent suggestions, and a task manager for keeping Firefox's power consumption under control.
Computing

Here's our guide to how to charge your laptop using a USB-C cable

Charging via USB-C is a great way to power up your laptop. It only takes one cable and you can use the same one for data as well as power -- perfect for new devices with limited port options.
Computing

Apple MacBook Air vs. Microsoft Surface Pro 6

The MacBook Air was updated with more contemporary components and a more modern design, but is that enough to compete with standouts like Microsoft's Surface Pro 6 detachable tablet?
Computing

Installing fonts in Windows 10 is quick and easy -- just follow these steps

Want to know how to install fonts in Windows 10? Here's our guide on two easy ways to get the job done, no matter how many you want to add to your existing catalog, plus instructions for deleting fonts.