If you want to visit the ISS, you’d better start saving. And working out, too

international-space-station-visits
NASA

If you’ve ever wanted to visit space and you have a few million dollars to spare, now’s your chance: The International Space Station (ISS) will soon begin accepting space tourists. But not just anyone will be allowed on board — there will be a strict set of training requirements for potential astronauts, NASA told Digital Trends.

“NASA will work with commercial companies to identify minimum training requirements with safety as a top priority,” Gary Jordan of the NASA Johnson Space Center told Digital Trends.

He explained that the training would be provided by a commercial company and would focus on the particular training needs that a business would choose for its astronauts, with NASA’s oversight.

Set to begin as early as 2020, the trips would be run by two companies, Boeing and SpaceX, which will ferry both NASA and private astronauts to and from the ISS in the companies’ Dragon capsule and Starliner craft, respectively.

The price for a stay will be around $35,000 per night, and that is just for staying at the ISS. It does not include the bill for the trip to and from the station, which will cost an additional $58 million for a return ticket. Although like all the best hotels, the ISS does cover breakfast, Wi-Fi, and use of the gym, with the price including expenses relating to food, exercise equipment, and the all-important data downlink.

The station could host up to two short private astronaut missions per year, each up to 30 days long. That means a full stay would cost more than $1 million.

If it sounds concerning that private citizens will be sent into space where something could go wrong, don’t worry, NASA has considered this. If there is a problem and a private astronaut should be injured, they will have the infrastructure of NASA to back them up. “Every astronaut receives basic medical training to operate in the event of an injury, and will have support from 24/7 mission control operation on the ground,” Jordan said.

In addition to space vacations for curious citizens, the ISS will also host private companies’ activities aboard the ISS laboratories. Apparently, NASA is open to suggestion for what these commercial activities could be. Performing scientific experiments in microgravity? Publicity stunts for brands? Sending influencers into space?

“The announcement of the new commercial and marketing policy by NASA is essentially an invitation for private companies to suggest these ideas — something they would suggest as a viable commercial opportunity worth consideration,” Jordan explained.  “NASA’s goal is to stimulate a low-Earth orbit economy by enabling these activities through this new policy.”

Emerging Tech

The U.K.’s biggest (and only) asteroid mining company has designs on our skies

Is the founder and CEO of the U.K.'s Asteroid Mining Corporation going to be among the first people to strike it rich in space, or is he just chasing an ambitious but doomed mirage?
Emerging Tech

Want to work in the stars? Here are six future space jobs you could hold

Ever dreamed of leaving Earth to work in the stars? Here's a list of job titles that might sound like science fiction now, but almost certainly won’t a decade or two in the future.
Emerging Tech

Hormone boosts could help astronauts from losing muscle on long space journeys

Reduced gravity conditions during space flight missions can cause extreme muscle loss. Special hormone treatments may be able to help. Here's why that's of growing importance for space travel.
Health & Fitness

Best Buy focuses on fitness with new range of high-tech gym equipment

Best Buy is focusing on fitness with the launch of new in-store spaces featuring a range of connected health-boosting equipment. The new sections, which will be staffed by experts, will open at 100 Best Buy stores this year.
Emerging Tech

SpaceX is on a hiring spree for its Starlink global internet project

After a string of delays, SpaceX's Starlink project was finally launched last month. Now an analysis of data from SpaceX's job listings shows the company is on a hiring tear, advertising for more and more positions for the project.
Emerging Tech

Ready to roll: Mars 2020 rover fitted with wheels ahead of mission next year

The Mars 2020 rover is getting ready for its trip to the red planet next year. The latest step in readying the rover is installing its wheels and suspension system, which engineers at NASA have been doing this month.
Emerging Tech

Awesome Tech You Can’t Buy Yet: Illuminated keyboards and a retro gaming console

Check out our roundup of the best new crowdfunding projects and product announcements that hit the web this week. You may not be able to buy this stuff yet, but it sure is fun to gawk!
Emerging Tech

You can help search for aliens with an open access release of SETI data

The Breakthrough Initiatives, a program to search for extraterrestrial intelligence, recently analyzed its first three years of radio telescope data. And all of the data collected is being made publicly available in an open data archive.
Emerging Tech

Tiny galaxy has huge black hole at its center, gives clues to galactic evolution

A Hubble image shows a tiny galaxy which could hold the clue to unraveling a longstanding question about the evolution of galaxies. Despite its small size, it hosts a feature found in much larger galaxies -- a supermassive black hole.
Emerging Tech

Dark matter galaxy crashed into the Milky Way, causing the ripples in its disk

New research suggests hundreds of million of years ago, the Milky Way collided with Antlia 2, a nearby dwarf galaxy dominated by dark matter. The collision caused ripples in the disk of gas around the Milky Way which we still observe today.
Emerging Tech

Uranus’ rings shine brightly but hold a puzzle for astronomers

New images reveal the rings around Uranus, which are almost invisible to most telescopes. But there's a strange puzzle about them -- why they don't contain any small dust-sized particles.
Emerging Tech

U.S. Navy is working on making its fleet invisible to computerized surveillance

The U.S. Navy’s ever-innovative Office of Naval Research is working on a way to turn the United States military fleet invisible. Well, to cutting-edge image-recognition systems, at least.
News

Apple’s new Seattle campus may mean big things for Siri, artificial intelligence

Apple plans to hire 2,000 more employees for a new Seattle campus, the company announced Monday, with a significant number of those jobs focused on Siri and artificial intelligence.
Emerging Tech

How to watch SpaceX’s most difficult Falcon Heavy launch ever

SpaceX will launch a Falcon Heavy rocket Monday evening in its most challenging launch yet. The launch is scheduled for Monday June 24 at 8:30 p.m. PT, but is dependent on weather conditions. You can watch NASA's livestream with coverage…