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Want to be an ace pilot before you buy an expensive drone? Practice with this $120 quadcopter

As far as drones go, the Swann Xtreem Gravity Pursuit is as stripped-down as a bowling ball. It doesn’t contain GPS,  or any sort of piloting assistance to aid you in flying. But its $120 price point makes this one of the most affordable mid-sized drones you’ll find, and it’s perfect for those who want to get into the drone hobby without learning to fly for the first time on a $500+ platform.

Higher-end drones do have smart features to make it easy for anyone to fly, but they don’t always work all the time. So learning to fly on the Gravity Xtreem is akin to learning how to drive a stick shift car. You’ll have to be in control the entire time you’re flying, and you’ll also have to correct for wind and even occasional drifting. The learning curve is a bit steeper, but the experience will help make you a better drone pilot when you’re ready to up your game and graduate up to a more advanced multicopter.

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