Moga Pro Review

It’s a niche product for a specific type of mobile gamer, but the MOGA Pro is the best of what’s out there for what it does.
It’s a niche product for a specific type of mobile gamer, but the MOGA Pro is the best of what’s out there for what it does.
It’s a niche product for a specific type of mobile gamer, but the MOGA Pro is the best of what’s out there for what it does.

Highs

  • Familiar Xbox-inspired design
  • App-supported games integrate well
  • Rechargeable battery

Lows

  • MOGA games only exist on Android devices
  • Niche appeal

DT Editors' Rating

PowerA’s MOGA is a nifty little game controller for Android users that are content to game on the go with nubby analog controls and pint-sized face buttons. Serious gamers can appreciate the pocket-friendly peripheral as well, but for games like Grand Theft Auto: Vice City, Dead Trigger, and others that port over or emulate console play, the little MOGA doesn’t cut it.

Enter the MOGA Pro.

Based on the design of PowerA’s excellent FUS1ON Tournament Controller for Xbox 360, the MOGA Pro performs exactly the same as its little brother does. The difference is that it’s wrapped in the familiar form factor of a modern day twin thumbstick controller.

…the mounting arm extends far enough to accommodate even Samsung’s sub-tablet Galaxy Note II.

Setup is a snap. Simply download the MOGA Pivot app onto your Bluetooth-enabled Android device of choice – smartphone or tablet, doesn’t matter, as long as you’re running version 2.3 or later – and fire it up. On screen directions guide you through the quick and painless process of turning on the controller and pairing it. Once that’s done, the controller works automatically with any Pivot-supported game as well as with the Pivot app itself.

Another nice upgrade in the MOGA Pro is a built-in rechargeable battery that PowerA rates at 12-15 hours. The battery certainly held up to extended use during our testing. Charging is done using an included USB cord, though you’ll need a computer to connect it to as there’s no outlet adapter.

The Pro includes an extendable plastic smartphone mount similar to the one found on the smaller MOGA. Weight distribution threatens to throw balance off with some of the larger devices, but the mounting arm extends far enough to accommodate even Samsung’s sub-tablet Galaxy Note II.

Tucked away beneath the mounting arm is a power switch with A and B settings. The former is what you set the controller to when pairing with the Pivot app, bringing full-on controller support to the 60-odd (and growing) library of games accessible in Pivot. The B setting allows the controller to work with unsupported games.

In-game performance is a welcome improvement over obtrusive virtual touchscreen controls that many of these games are saddled with. The Pivot-supported apps come with the best implementation and support, including MOGA Pro-specific control layout screens and the like. Unsupported games are unsurprisingly a bit rougher and more latency-prone, but the Pivot library offers plenty on its own.

As for the controller itself, it’s an Xbox 360 gamepad. The button placement and form factor is exactly the same as PowerA’s FUS1ON. You even get left/right analog trigger, a welcome upgrade from the digital “click” triggers of the earlier MOGA.

Conclusion

The question of whether or not the MOGA Pro’s $50 price is a good value depends entirely on how much Android gaming you do. MOGA Pivot supports most of the big-ticket console-style games available for the mobile OS, and PowerA promises more to come. It’s a niche product for a specific type of mobile gamer, but the MOGA Pro is the best of what’s out there for what it does.

Highs

  • Familiar Xbox-inspired design
  • App-supported games integrate well
  • Rechargeable battery

Lows

  • MOGA games only exist on Android devices
  • Niche appeal
Product Review

The iPad Pro is the best tablet ever. But don't sell your laptop just yet

Apple has unveiled a big redesign for the iPad Pro, slimming down the bezels, adding Face ID, and the ability to attach and charge the Apple Pencil. All of this comes at a high cost however, as the iPad Pro starts at $799.
Smart Home

These wireless security cameras are a wire-free way to protect your home

Home security cameras can give you piece of mind, but if they have wires, are limited in where you can put them. We've rounded up the best battery-operated home security cameras to give you flexibility along with your security.
Gaming

How do Nintendo Switch, Xbox One X compare to each other? We find out

The Nintendo Switch is innovative enough to stand apart from traditional consoles, but could it become your primary gaming system? How does the Switch stack up against the Xbox One?
Gaming

Xbox One S vs. PlayStation 4 Slim: Which console is worth your money?

Microsoft's new Xbox One S and Sony's PlayStation 4 "Slim" have bucked the generational gaming console trend. But which of these stopgap systems is worth spending your paycheck on?
Computing

Turn your Raspberry Pi into a Steam streaming hub with Valve’s Steam Link app

Valve's Steam Link app is now fully supported by Raspberry PI hardware, meaning that just about anyone with a few dollars to spare can build their own Steam streaming box in a matter of minutes.
Gaming

Nintendo pulls the plug on making more SNES Classic, NES Classic systems

Nintendo extended production of the NES Classic and SNES Classic into 2018, but once the current supply of consoles is gone, the company won't be making more. Instead, you'll have to use Nintendo Switch Online.
Gaming

Fancy ‘Kingdom Hearts III’ PlayStation 4 Pro launches alongside game in January

A limited edition PlayStation 4 Pro bundle for Kingdom Hearts III will launch alongside the game in January. The system included has a special design on the side, as does the controller.
Gaming

Want to share your Xbox One games? Here's how to do it

Sharing games on modern consoles is possible, but it takes a few steps. Here's how to start sharing games on your Xbox One console, so friends and family can easily access your library.
Gaming

Here's where Xur is and what he has for wares this week in 'Destiny 2: Forsaken'

The weekly vendor in Destiny 2: Forsaken always brings Exotic weapons and armor, some of the toughest loot to find in the game. Here's everything you need to know to track down Xur: Where he is, when he shows up, and what he's stocking.
Gaming

‘Fortnite’ removes the Infinity Blade weapon after player backlash

Following player backlash over the Infinity Blade weapon's inclusion in Fortnite's battle royale mode, Epic Games decided to remove the weapon from the game completely. It was not limited to a special mode.
Gaming

Want every suit in 'Marvel's Spider-Man' for PS4? Here's how to get them all

Marvel's Spider-Man features a whopping 33 different suits for Peter Parker to wear as he swings across New York City knocking out baddies. Here are all the suits and how to unlock them.
Gaming

Everything about 'Red Dead Online', including its new microtransaction store

Red Dead Online will gradually rolled out to Red Dead Redemption 2 players via a beta. We've got all the details about the beta's suite of competitive and cooperative modes, as well as what to expect going forward.
Computing

HDR monitors are beginning to have an impact. Here are the best you can buy

HDR isn't the most common of PC monitor features and is often charged at a premium, but the list of available options is growing. These are the best HDR monitors you can buy right now.
Virtual Reality

Oculus Rift vs. HTC Vive: Prices drop, but our favorite stays the same

The Oculus Rift and HTC Vive are the two big names in the virtual reality arena, but most people can only afford one. Our comparison tells you which is best when you pit the Oculus Rift vs. HTC Vive.