Skip to main content

The best co-op games on PC

PCs were where multiplayer gaming began. While consoles stole the spotlight for a while by allowing multiple people to easily play on one system together, PCs have always taken the lead in providing players with the most options for multiplayer gaming. Most of the time, people come to PCs for competitive action, and there are a ton of options for those looking to go head to head in just about any genre imaginable, but there’s also a wealth of high-quality and unique experiences that focus on co-operation.

Co-op games focus on, or at least feature, two or more players working together against the game itself. That can take the form of puzzles, enemy A.I., or even just the systems of the game itself. There’s hardly any genre out there that hasn’t at least had a few tries at adding in co-op, and with online gaming being the norm, more and more people are looking to use games as a way to hang out with friends as well as have fun. PC gamers almost have too many co-op games to pick from now, which is why we have scoured all the storefronts and picked out 15 of the best co-op games you can play on PC.

See more

Tiny Tina's Wonderlands

Tiny Tina's Wonderlands
4/5
RP
Platforms PC (Microsoft Windows), PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X|S
Genre Shooter, Role-playing (RPG), Adventure
Developer Gearbox Software
Publisher 2K Games
Release March 25, 2022
Tiny Tina’s Wonderlands is technically a spinoff from the core Borderlands series, but essentially in name only. As far as co-op fun, this game is exactly the thing you expect from the looter-shooter series, only with a much-needed change of tone and coat of fantasy paint. The humor, for once, is actually appropriate and not immediately grating, and the new mechanics that are introduced for the tabletop-style framing device are used to great effect. It’s not the longest game, but if you just want a fun time blasting tons of skeletons, looting, shooting spells, leveling up, and looting even more, Tiny Tina’s Wonderlands is a perfect choice.

Lost Ark

Lost Ark
57 %
M
Platforms PC (Microsoft Windows)
Genre Role-playing (RPG), Hack and slash/Beat 'em up, Adventure
Developer Tripod Studio
Publisher Smilegate RPG, Amazon Game Studios, GameOn, My.com
Release December 04, 2018
The newest MMO on the block, Lost Ark has taken the world by storm ever since it finally released outside of Korea, where it was already a phenomenon. This is an isometric fantasy RPG with tons of classes, skills, quests, and dungeon crawling to do, all of which is made even better by partying up with your friends. The best part about Lost Ark is that, since it was released much earlier in Korea, it has already gone through many of the growing pains of a new MMO, letting you start with a much more polished version right off the bat.

Phasmophobia

Phasmophobia
71 %
Platforms PC (Microsoft Windows)
Genre Puzzle, Tactical, Indie
Developer Kinetic Games
Publisher Kinetic Games
Release September 18, 2020
A horror game is probably one of the last genres you would expect to have multiplayer, let alone co-op, and still be good. In fact, there’s been more than one case where adding co-op to a horror series has ended up killing the franchise. Just look at FEAR 3 and Dead Space 3. This indie horror game decided to take on that challenge and create Phasmophobia, which took the world by storm when streams caught on to how terrifying the experience was, even though they were teamed up with other players. Thanks to some unique mechanics, this is perhaps the best co-op horror game you can play on PC. You and your friends take the role of ghost hunters in Phasmophobia. Each investigation is different, but with the same ultimate goal. You need to explore the haunted location, gather clues with your various ghost hunting tools, and attempt to determine what type of entity is haunting the place to try and get rid of it. This is much more than just wandering around a haunted house in the dark with friends, though. Phasmophobia utilizes voice recognition so that spirits can hear and even respond to what you say. This can draw them to your location if you’re too loud, or even give you answers to certain questions that can help figure out what’s really going on. In either case, the results are creepy at best and terrifying at worst. Give this one a shot if you’ve got a group of brave souls to bring along.

Valheim

Valheim
86 %
Platforms Linux, PC (Microsoft Windows)
Genre Role-playing (RPG), Adventure, Indie
Developer Iron Gate AB
Publisher Coffee Stain Publishing
Release February 02, 2021
Survival games have been a hot genre for almost a decade now and don’t show any signs of slowing down. One of the newer ones to catch on in a major way is the Norse inspired Valheim. This early access title initially caught the gaming public’s eye for its interesting art style that combined somewhat low detail textures with high quality lighting and particle effects that make the game feel like it takes place in a fairy tale book. Once you get into the game itself, however, it is clear that the game’s unique qualities are more than just visual. Yes, it is a survival game at heart, but Valheim puts its own welcome spin on things that make it even more fun to play with friends. Dropped into the randomly generated world of Valheim, survival is your first goal as you would expect. You and your friends will gather resources, build settlements, make upgrades, and all those classic survival game staples. Where Valheim starts to get interesting is in the progression. There are a series of bosses that act as goals for you and your team to build towards. Each one has unique moves and drops, allowing you to advance further, explore new areas, and challenge even more difficult bosses. Of course you could always ignore these combat challenges and focus on simply creating your own ideal home, farm, village, or what have you as well. Valheim can be as calm and relaxing, or brutal and heart pounding, as you and your friends want it to be.

No Man's Sky

No Man's Sky
69 %
3/5
T
Platforms PC (Microsoft Windows), PlayStation 4, Xbox One, SteamVR, PlayStation VR, PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X|S, Meta Rift
Genre Shooter, Role-playing (RPG), Simulator, Adventure, Indie
Developer Hello Games
Publisher Hello Games, 505 Games, Sony Interactive Entertainment
Release August 09, 2016
From the ancient world of trolls and swords we head into the endless expanse of space for the next survival crafting game, No Man’s Sky. At this point this game has earned a near universal level of notoriety and acclaim for launching in a state that fell far below the expectations it set for itself, only to add more and more content, all free by the way, over the course of more than half a decade until it has become even more than what was initially promised. In fact, the game is nearly unrecognizable from the launched product, and all for the better. In fact, it initially didn’t even allow for true co-op play, but now we can’t imagine the game without it. No Man’s Sky puts you in the shoes, or space boots rather, of an astronaut in a nearly endless universe of planets, ships, aliens, and mysteries to explore. The game does technically have a main plot, simply reaching the center of the universe, but even accomplishing that goal doesn’t end the game and encourages you to explore all the other systems and events the game has. You and a friend can set up a base on a particular planet, go on missions throughout the stars, gather resources and craft upgrades, or simply explore a planet no one has ever set foot on. The sheer scope of No Man’s Sky make every discovery feel that much more satisfying and personal, and sharing that with a friend just makes it all the more memorable.
Read our full No Man's Sky review

Monster Hunter: World

Monster Hunter: World
85 %
T
Platforms PC (Microsoft Windows), PlayStation 4, Xbox One
Genre Role-playing (RPG), Adventure
Developer Capcom
Publisher Capcom
Release January 26, 2018
After so many entries locked to console, the Monster Hunter franchise finally came to PC with arguably the best version of the game made yet. Taking full advantage of the power afforded to modern systems, Monster Hunter: World not only looks amazing, but is almost dangerous in how deep it can suck you and your friends into the game’s satisfying loop. The complex mechanics, deep systems, and almost endless amount of variety, customization, and content have never felt as well realized as they have with Monster Hunter: World on PC. Add in all the extra content they’ve added, plus the Iceborn expansion pack, and there’s easily hundreds of hours you and your team can sink into this experience. You’re a monster hunter with the sole purpose of going on missions to track, hunt, fight, and capture all types of massive beasts. While you can do it solo, Monster Hunter: World really begs to be played in a co-op party. The different weapons all serve unique purposes, almost making each player their own different class in a way, so that teaming up and synergizing strengths and weaknesses against an overwhelming force just feels like the intended way to play. Monster Hunter: World is also a game perfect for chilling out and grinding familiar monsters for drops while you chat and relax with pals.

Deep Rock Galactic

Deep Rock Galactic
83 %
T
Platforms PC (Microsoft Windows), PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PlayStation 5
Genre Shooter, Adventure, Indie
Developer Ghost Ship Games
Publisher Coffee Stain Publishing
Release May 13, 2020
This will start the trilogy of Left 4 Dead style games, but they’re all about as similar as a Call of Duty is to a Doom game. Deep Rock Galactic, as our first example, is a game that has been steadily improving since it was put into early access in 2018, and is now one of the most popular and best co-op games on Steam. Again, as many games on this list are, Deep Rock Galactic is something you can play alone, but the game was undeniably intended for teams of four to play together. For the development team’s first game, Deep Rock Galactic has already been given multiple awards as a multiplayer experience. In Deep Rock Galactic you take on the role of a team of space dwarfs who undergo various missions in procedurally generated caves. There are four classes of dwarf to pick from, Engineer, Gunner, Driller, and Scout, that each have their own weapons, utility, and progression system. Gameplay is a mix of the aforementioned Left 4 Dead style of gunning down endless waves of mobs while frantically trying to get to and accomplish your objective, plus dynamic terrain destruction and resource gathering for permanent progression. Thanks to the randomly generated levels, this is a game you and your friends can dive back into and chip away at time and time again.

Warhammer: Vermintide 2

Warhammer: Vermintide 2
76 %
M
Platforms PC (Microsoft Windows), PlayStation 4, Xbox One
Genre Shooter, Adventure, Indie
Developer Fatshark
Publisher Fatshark
Release March 08, 2018
The most obvious game on the list inspired by Left 4 Dead has to be Warhammer: Vermintide 2. This game, obviously using the Warhammer license, was the most notable attempt to not just copy that game’s formula, but really innovate and put a new spin on. Since Left 4 Dead 2 is still so playable today, that was the right call, and it paid off. Warhammer: Vermintide 2 has picked up not only fans of the Warhammer universe, but those looking to shake up the hoard based, co-op survival experience with new enemies, weapons, and systems that the aging zombie shooter just doesn’t provide. There’s even an upcoming sequel of sorts, Warhammer 40,000: Darktide that will take this same formula to the 40K universe. Warhammer: Vermintide 2 is set in the first person perspective, but with a much heavier emphasis on melee combat. There are some guns and ranged weapons, but for the most part you’ll be swinging swords, hammers, and other blunt and slashing objects. The target? Giant humanoid rats and mutants, which seems like a no brainer in terms of the perfect enemy to send at players in massive swarms. There are five classes to pick from for your team, dozens of weapons, abilities, and four massive DLC expansions that have more than doubled the content the game launched with. If you’ve played all the Left 4 Dead maps forwards and backwards a dozen times already, Warhammer: Vermintide 2 will put the fear and excitement of barely scraping through a mission back in your blood.

Left 4 Dead 2

Left 4 Dead 2
82 %
M
Platforms Linux, PC (Microsoft Windows), Xbox 360, Mac
Genre Shooter
Developer Valve Corporation, Turtle Rock Studios
Publisher Valve Corporation
Release November 17, 2009
Yes, there’s no getting around it. Even over a decade after release, we’re still always ready to jump into a game of Left 4 Dead 2. It is obviously the sequel to the original, but at this point it has absorbed that game whole and become the Left 4 Dead experience. Thanks to a more stylized art style, emphasis on color, and perfect mix of variety and balance, Left 4 Dead 2 doesn’t feel like it’s aged a day. Many have tried to take its throne, even the game’s own original developers, but there’s something about the simplicity of this seminal zombie co-op shooter that keeps us, and thousands of others, coming back to it time and time again. The set up is simple: You and three other survivors pick a campaign where you need to fight your way between safe rooms, completing objectives along the way, while endless amounts of zombies whittle away at you. The standard mobs are nothing to worry much about, even in huge numbers, which is where the special infected come in. These can incapacitate you in a variety of ways, requiring a teammate to free you before your health is drained. Going solo is going to get  you killed in seconds, so sticking together and communicating is a requirement. Between the base game’s campaigns, all the ones carried over from the first Left 4 Dead, and the insane amount of user created content, Left 4 Dead 2 is the gold standard for survival co-op games.

Destiny 2

Destiny 2
74 %
4.5/5
T
Platforms PC (Microsoft Windows), PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X|S, Google Stadia
Genre Shooter, Role-playing (RPG), Tactical, Adventure
Developer Bungie
Publisher Activision
Release September 06, 2017
The Destiny games have had their ups and downs. The first game was notoriously lacking in story and long term content, but was able to build itself into a pretty solid experience by the time the final expansion came out. Destiny 2 kind of reset things, unfortunately, but has had even more time to fill in it’s content gaps with not only more expansions, but more experimental and ambitious additions. Sure, the game is in a constant flux of balance and available content that will keep some members of the community upset, but no one can deny that Destiny 2 is an insanely satisfying shooter to play with your pals. Billed as a shared world shooter, think a small scale MMO, Destiny 2 is all about co-operation. Events in the world will automatically join you up with anyone else in the area to take on a threat or do an objective, plus all the story content is built for you to bring a squad along. Of course, it’s in the end game level stuff that the co-op really shines. Raids in particular require not only a high level of FPS skill and maxed out characters with top level gear, but critical thinking and coordination among your party in order to make it through these long gauntlets of combat and puzzle challenges. If that’s not your speed, there’s always the PvP modes where you can play more traditional team based multiplayer modes. If you need a solid FPS to fall back on with your pals, Destiny 2 will have something to offer you.
Read our full Destiny 2 review

Warframe

Warframe
76 %
M
Platforms PC (Microsoft Windows), PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch, PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X|S
Genre Shooter, Role-playing (RPG), Adventure
Developer Digital Extremes
Publisher Digital Extremes
Release March 25, 2013
For whatever reason, Warframe has not gotten as much public attention as it’s competitors like Destiny 2. That’s a real shame, because in a lot of ways Destiny 2 owes a lot of it’s success to what Warframe had done before it. This little game that could started out with a simple concept of making a game about ninjas in space, but has grown so much and in so many different ways that it is almost unbelievable. What was first a game where you took on pretty linear missions in just a handful of environments, with very slick and satisfying movement, has become essentially a looter shooter MMO hybrid, plus some Monster Hunter in there, with a massive 11 major expansions already released, the latest coming at the very end of 2021. Like most ambitious games, Warframe had a middling start, but has essentially only gotten better and better in the years since, which is not an easy feat. It’s a weird comparison to make since Warframe came first, but if you imagine all the things you can do in Destiny 2, only in third person, with way more movement options, more skills, classes, abilities, and … well … basically everything, you will have an idea of what Warframe is. Zipping around levels, blasting through trash mobs, and grinding for that next rare drop is satisfying enough on its own, but with friends is even sweeter. Plus there’s a surprisingly deep story here, and tons of other new activities like flying your own ship or even fishing. Warframe has basically become its own MMO, but with some of the best third person combat on the market.

Portal 2

Portal 2
92 %
E10
Platforms Linux, PC (Microsoft Windows), PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, Mac
Genre Shooter, Platform, Puzzle, Adventure
Developer Valve Corporation
Publisher Valve Corporation, Electronic Arts
Release April 19, 2011
An oldie, sure, but who can deny Portal 2 as one of the best puzzle games of all time? The first game was a surprise hit when packaged inside the Orange Box all those years ago, but Valve took notice to the amazing reception it got. That little game, introducing the simple concept of solving puzzles in a 3D environment by placing and jumping through two connected portals, was not only a satisfying and novel mechanic at the time, but lends itself perfectly to a room based puzzle game. When they added in the sarcastic and mechanical humor of the main AI antagonist, it all just clicked together into a near perfect little game. Portal 2, as a sequel, had a lot to live up to. Setting the single player aside, since we’re focusing on co-op games here, even the idea of co-op in a puzzle game like this was risky. Portal 2 already introduced a bunch of new concepts, like gels, lasers, and light bridges, so adding two more portals to the mix could’ve easily been overwhelming and made puzzles either too difficult, or easily broken. Thankfully, the genius designers managed to make an entire co-op experience that feels just as satisfying to solve as the rest of the experience. Teamwork is once again key, and usually works so that both players will have opportunities to reach a solution to a problem rather than one person basically just directing the other around the entire time. It also doesn’t hurt that the two robots you play as are rather adorable and packed with personality despite never speaking.

It Takes Two

It Takes Two
89 %
T
Platforms PC (Microsoft Windows), PlayStation 4, Xbox One, PlayStation 5, Xbox Series X|S
Genre Platform, Adventure
Developer Hazelight Studios
Publisher Electronic Arts
Release March 25, 2021
The underdog winner of The Game Awards game of the year category, It Takes Two is the only game on this list that has to be played in co-op. Just like Hazelight’s previous game, A Way Out, there’s no option to even start this game without a teammate by your side. Because of that, this is perhaps the most tuned and crafted game on the list for co-op play since the entire design, both in terms of story and game play, depend on two players. It Takes Two really feels like the pinnacle of all the co-op ideas the team wanted to get into their last game, and despite a mixed reception to the actual narrative, is an amazing experience from start to finish. Playing as a couple about to enter a divorce, It Takes Two transforms the two characters into handmade doll versions of themselves. Each player takes the role of either the husband or wife, and start their journey to try and return to their normal bodies. At heart, this is a 3D puzzle platformer, but it is also so much more than that. Nearly every hour you will get some new mechanic to play with that has a use on its own, as well as when used in conjunction with whatever different mechanic your partner has. The amount of variety and creativity the team has with this is amazing, and will keep you fully engaged the entire time since you will never play with the same tool set for long enough to get bored of it before the game throws something entirely new at you. Regardless about how you feel about the story itself, this is just a blast to play with a friend all the way through.

Diablo III

Diablo III
79 %
M
Platforms PC (Microsoft Windows), PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, Mac, PlayStation 4, Xbox One
Genre Role-playing (RPG), Hack and slash/Beat 'em up, Adventure
Developer Blizzard Entertainment
Publisher Blizzard Entertainment, Square Enix
Release May 15, 2012
How could we have a list with so many loot based games without at least mentioning the series that popularized the term? Thankfully, we can do more than just pay tribute to the Diablo games because Diablo 3 has become not only a fantastic loot game, but among the best co-op loot games the PC has to offer. This series has spawned countless imitators, and some like Path of Exile are even giving the series a run for its money, however Diablo 3 still has that high quality polish that few other games can offer. The initial release was indeed a rough start, but the team stuck with the game and is now above and beyond what fans wanted from the series. With the sequel still looking like it won’t be coming any time soon, Diablo 3 doesn’t feel old at all to gather in with your friends and mow down some demonic mobs. Whether you’re an old vet or brand new to the series, Diablo 3 is the perfect place to experience a great co-op adventure. After so many updates and expansions, there are plenty of classes to pick from, level up, gear up, and experiment with in a very adjustable range of difficulties. Even when you max out one character, which alone will take you dozens of hours, there’s always end game content to run through, or all the other classes to give a shot that play completely differently. Sharing loot, taking down bosses, and going on quests with your friends feels like a real adventure that can range from nail biting to a mindless stomp through swarms of mobs while you catch up depending on what you’re looking for. Teaming up is easy, seamless, and progress is carried over for everyone involved, not just the host.

Final Fantasy XIV Online

Final Fantasy XIV Online
82 %
T
Platforms PC (Microsoft Windows), PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4, PlayStation 5
Genre Role-playing (RPG), Strategy, Adventure
Developer Square Enix
Publisher Square Enix
Release August 27, 2013
The only true MMORPG on this list is the underdog that came back from near death to take the crown from the once invincible World of Warcraft. Of course we’re talking about Final Fantasy XIV, the current gold standard for an online game reinventing itself and almost becoming too popular over time. Not many people were around to experience the original version of the game, but the revival of this struggling MMO is very well documented and needs not be repeated here. The point is, it is at the top of its game now and shows no signs of dropping in quality. What’s most impressive is you don’t need to be a Final Fantasy fan, or even a real MMO fan, to have a great experience. As an MMO, Final Fantasy XIV naturally encourages co-op play just like any other. You can run through the entire main story, which now spans almost a dozen expansions, plus all the raids and side activities. Basically, anything you can do in this game, you can do with your friends. There’s guild mechanics to form larger groups, and tons of tools to make playing together easy. They even allow players to visit other servers so if you and a friend happen to be playing on different servers, you can still team up without having to start from scratch on their server. The quality of life features are second to none, much like the game’s narrative which is quickly becoming many people’s favorite Final Fantasy story of all time, MMO or not. This is one game that deserves a monthly subscription for how much regular content it offers you and your friends to take on.

PAYDAY 2

PAYDAY 2
73 %
M
Platforms PC (Microsoft Windows), PlayStation 3, Xbox 360, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch
Genre Shooter, Role-playing (RPG), Tactical
Developer Overkill Software
Publisher 505 Games, Starbreeze Studios
Release August 13, 2013
Let’s face it, we all have wished to be part of a heist at some point in our lives. Since doing so in real life would be a massive mistake, we thankfully have Payday 2 to live out those fantasies through. This is another slightly older title, but one that has benefited from all that time with dedicated support from the developers to keep refining and adding to the game. What was initially a somewhat simple game of getting a squad together, scoping out one of a few locations, and almost always ending up having to shoot your way out with the loot, has evolved into a huge narrative adventure, dozens of locations and scenarios, and multiple tools and ways to tackle them quietly or guns blazing. If it wasn’t obvious, Payday 2 places you and your friends in the shoes of a group of thieves trying to pull off a variety of heists. You start off undetected, able to walk around the location, find guards, cameras, locked doors, and other important pieces of intel. Depending on your class, you may also be able to set up some gadgets to keep you concealed a bit longer. Pulling off a fully stealth job requires a huge amount of prep, teamwork, and communication, but is one of the most rewarding accomplishments you can find. Of course, shooting it out is just as hair raising and enjoyable if you’ve got some reliable buddies watching your back.

Overcooked! 2

Overcooked! 2
82 %
E
Platforms Linux, PC (Microsoft Windows), Mac, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, Nintendo Switch
Genre Simulator, Strategy, Tactical, Indie, Arcade
Developer Ghost Town Games
Publisher Team17
Release August 07, 2018
Cooking is a mechanic in many games, mostly RPGs, but usually not the main focus of a game. There’s even fewer games that make cooking the main focus and is centered around co-op. If that intrigues you, and you somehow missed it, then Overcooked 2 is your answer. Naturally, this is the sequel to the original Overcooked, and follows the same structure, only expanding on all the mechanics and having even more levels to cook through. If you don’t think that a cooking game would make for one of the most hilarious, frustrating, and rewarding co-op games, often being all of those within the span of seconds, then you really need to give this one a shot. Overcooked 2 is a cooking game with a very simple and easy to grasp game loop. You get orders for different foods that you need to prepare and serve before the time expires. The faster you can serve the meal, the more money you earn and more stars you will ultimately get when the level finishes. Dishes usually have just two or three ingredients that need to be prepared in some way, such as chopping, cooking, or boiling, before being combined on a plate and delivered to the right spot. Sounds simple, especially with three other friends to help out, right? Wrong. The level design in Overcooked 2 is what makes it ask for such a high level of teamwork. Sometimes ingredients will be moved away from the prep stations, or there could be shifting rows of tables that block access to different areas at certain times. You’ll never fall into a groove with Overcooked 2, and that’s what makes it such a fun game to go back to even after you’ve beaten all the levels.

Editors' Recommendations