(in)Secure

Cyber security has rapidly evolved from a minor concern to a serious problem. Breaches routinely expose our personal data, making it hard to know what and who we can trust. Even governments are frequently victims, and perpetrators, of major hacks.

The news breaks so quickly that it’s almost impossible to keep track of it all. (in)Secure, a weekly column, follows the trends, and screw-ups, you need to know about. We’ll touch on topics ranging from the laws behind cyber security, to the latest major breaches, to new methods that can help keep your data safe or, at least, minimize the damage.

Recent Stories
Computing

Pay-n-pray cybersecurity isn’t working. What if we just paid when it works?

Companies and individuals sink loads of money into cybersecurity each year, and yet with each passing month, the situation seems to worsen. Area 1 Security has a new philosophy -- and it could totally change the game.
Computing

Facebook wants to own your face. Here’s why that’s a privacy disaster

(in)Secure is a weekly column that dives into the rapidly escalating topic of cybersecurity. Scanning your face is easier than remembering a password, that’s for sure. But while facial recognition technology has gone mainstream with…
Computing

People are reading your email. Here’s how to make them stop

The contents of your email are no private, at least not to third party applications that connect to Gmail. That should be enough to worry most people. Here's how to know exactly who is reading your email and how to turn them away.
Computing

After 14 years, a new generation of Wi-Fi security is coming. Here’s what to know

Wireless security rarely gets as big an upgrade as WPA3 will bring about. As new hardware begins to support it, we should see much better password protections for all Wi-Fi users whether at home or in public.
Computing

Improving security means killing the password, but that battle has just begun

Although password use is in decline, switching to biometrics or machine-learning algorithms may not be enough to fix our digital security woes. We need to change the way we store login credentials, as well.
Computing

Why Mastercard is ripping a page from Bitcoin’s book

Mastercard's new blockchain patent seeks to put an end to credit card skimmers and make money safer. Regardless of what you think of cryptocurrency, the largest financial institutions are transforming real money to become more like it every…
Computing

Apple’s new privacy features are bad for Facebook, but great for everyone else

Apple announced several new privacy and cybersecurity features at WWDC 2018, specifically in its web browser, Safari. The company didn’t shy away from naming why it made the changes. It had Facebook right in its crosshairs.
Computing

Duck, cover, and reboot your router? Why the FBI’s new warning is no joke

The FBI has discovered up to 500,000 home or office routers could be vulnerable to a dangerous cyberattack. It sounds like an easy solution, but can resetting a router really stop a major cyberattack?
Computing

IBM banned USB drives. Is it the future of security or a knee-jerk reaction?

Banning USB devices might go some way to preventing data loss and leaks, but to some, it doesn't get to the heart of the problem of truly securing data and the networks its stored on.
Computing

You’ll never read Facebook’s new data policy, so we did it for you

You’re never going to read Facebook’s new data policy, so we did it for you. Not much has changed, but it reveals more information about how the social network tracks you across the internet.
Computing

Web trackers aren’t just spying on you; they’re slowing you down

Trackers might be found within the inner workings of most modern websites, but their impact could be far broader than just privacy invasions. They might be actively slowly down the internet as we know it.
Computing

Facebook’s very, very sorry, and it has absolutely no intention to change

Facebook’s F8 developer conference gave the company and its CEO, Mark Zuckerberg, a chance to atone for many, many sins. Instead, Facebook moved forward with a business-as-usual approach, announcing new features as if nothing had changed…
Computing

It took them 15 years to hack a master key for 40,000 hotels. But they did it

Security firm F-Secure announced a massive security vulnerability affecting millions of electronic locks worldwide this week. We sat down with the researchers to discuss how it made your next hotel stay a whole lot safer.
Computing

Cambridge Analytica’s ex-director wants to fix data privacy. Can we trust her?

Brittany Kaiser was working for Cambridge Analytica just months ago. After testifying before the UK Parliament about her involvement in the campaign behind Brexit, she’s hopping the fence to make the opposite point.
Computing

Cryptojacking is the new ransomware. Is that a good thing?

Cryptominers are now one of the most common types of malware, beating out long standing malicious software like ransomware. But is this new type of threat here to stay? We spoke to security experts to find out.
Computing

Your ISP can peep on your browsing, so Cloudflare is pulling down the shade

Everyone on the internet is looking for ways to protect their data online. We spoke to the cofounder of Cloudflare, which has built a privacy-first DNS resolver that claims to make the internet safer – and faster.
Computing

In the fight to protect your PC and privacy, Firefox is on the front line

Meltdown, Spectre, and Ryzenfall have only added to the pile of security exploits that can impact on our PCs. Dave Camp, Firefox’s Vice President of Engineering, told us how Mozilla’s browser helps defend against these threats.
Computing

Facebook was always too busy selling ads to care about your personal data

Facebook sold four billion dollars in ad revenue last year. Ultimately, the Cambridge Analytica scandal happened because Facebook has always cared more about selling ads than protecting your personal data.