Skip to main content

With 4,700 and counting, VinylHub aims to catalog every record shop on the planet

vinylhub record shop catalog discogs vinyl
franzj / flickr.com
Over the last 15 years, Discogs has developed the near-definitive database for vinyl fanatics, cataloging over 6 million records from nearly 4 million artists. Now the company is working on another laborious project: creating the largest global record store database in the world, called VinylHub.

“Discogs’ mission is to catalog every piece of music in the world, and now they are extending that to record shops,” said the company in its press release.

Initially launched a year ago, VinylHub’s user-generated database isn’t just aimed at cataloging every record shop, but also every record fair, and pop-up shop across the globe. Currently, 4,700 record shops are cataloged, including stores across North America, Europe, South America, Asia, Australia, and Africa.

For each store in the already-extensive record store database, VinylHub offers a description, address, business hours, links to websites, and even information like whether there’s an ATM available. (Similar to other user-generated databases like Wikipedia, it’s best to double-check the information before venturing out to a store.)

Vinylhub’s sister company Discogs is already one of the best avenues online for vinyl collection. The Discog database offers information and a physical music marketplace for 6.3 million recordings. Further, 2.5 million records have been sold on the site this year alone, according to Billboard. Notably, Discogs doesn’t sell records itself: it just offers a platform for record collectors to put up their collections and sellers to purchase them.

The site plans to launch its first official mobile app in the first quarter of 2016, which will offer users the ability to search the database for information and pricing on records and catalogue their collections. It’s unclear if VinylHub will be a part of Discogs’ mobile app but it would certainly be a nice feature.

Nearly 3 million users bought or sold a record through Discogs in 2014. Now, with VinylHub, those users and other record collectors will have a pretty comprehensive database on where to buy records from brick-and-mortar stores too — no matter where they are in the world.

Chris Leo Palermino
Former Digital Trends Contributor
Chris Leo Palermino is a music, tech, business, and culture journalist based between New York and Boston. He also contributes…
How to download music from Spotify for offline listening
How to download music and podcasts from Spotify: The downloads folder.

If you're a Spotify Premium user paying that premium Spotify fee, chances are you've taken at least some time curating playlists, liking songs, and using the platform's easy-to-use (and recently revamped) user interface to discover new and old music.

But sometimes all that music or your favorite podcasts aren't available if you find yourself without an internet connection to stream them from — like on a long plane ride or weekend camping trip in the sticks. That's where Spotify's offline listening feature comes in handy, allowing you to download playlists, albums, and podcasts through its desktop and mobile apps so you can still rock out while you're off the grid.

Read more
How to switch from Spotify to Apple Music
Spotify and Apple Music transfer on a smartphone.

Spotify is the world's most popular music streaming service for a reason. It has a massive catalog of music and podcasts, is full of cool music discovery and sharing features, and is really easy to use.
However, with its recent price increase and the fact that it still hasn't joined most of its peers in offering a hi-res audio quality option, you may be considering jumping ship for its closest competitor, Apple Music, which counts lossless hi-res tracks, mind-bending spatial audio, Dolby Atmos Music tracks, and a catalog that rivals Spotify's among the many attractive reasons to switch.

But there's one problem: you’ve spent a lot of time creating playlists and marking songs and albums as your favorites in Spotify. Is it worth the switch? Will all that hard work be lost in translation?

Read more
The best laptops for music production, chosen by experts
best laptops for music production

The world has gone pretty far when it comes to the processing power that we carry around with us, and if you're big into music production, then you're the luckiest of all. Some of the best laptops on the market have high-end CPUs for relatively low prices, which means that if you want to do music production on a laptop, you have a huge number of choices. Of course, that does also mean that it can be hard to navigate and pick the best laptop for your budget and needs, which is why we've done the legwork for you. We've collected our favorite picks below in various categories so that you can pick them with ease. Plus, we've even thrown in a quick guide on what to look for so that if you don't find what you want here, you can check out these other laptop deals for alternatives.
The Best Laptops for Music Production

Best overall laptop for music production:
Best Windows device for music production:
Best portable laptop for music production:
Best large-screen laptop for music production:
Best for 2-in-1 laptop for music production:

Read more