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See if airlines owe you money from up to 3 years ago with AirHelp’s new tool

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Trevor Mogg / Trevor Mogg
It’s hard enough getting airlines to reimburse you for that hellish trip you had to endure last night, much less last year. But now, one app is helping you set wrongs right, even if those wrongs occurred in the not-so-recent past. AirHelp, which last year announced a boarding pass scanner to give real-time information about delayed flight compensation, is now launching a new tool that will help you travel back in time — that is, with regard to airline payback.

Available on both the web and on your mobile device, AirHelp’s newest tool connects to your email address, scanning for all flights you’ve taken in the last three years, and importing that information into the AirHelp database. From there, the tool will be able to check your eligibility for compensation for flights that were delayed or canceled. Moreover, the feature allows you to visually map all the journeys you’ve taken in recent memory, so you can see what a globetrotter you really are. You can also check out how much money you’ve spent on flight tickets (yikes).

Folks need only connect AirHelp to their email account once — after that, the tool will be able to update you on future eligibility for compensation whenever your flight plans are disrupted.

“Raising awareness of air passenger rights and identifying new ways to be a consumer advocate has always been our priority,” says AirHelp CEO and co-founder Henrik Zillmer. “Over nine million air passengers are entitled to compensation for disrupted flights every year, yet most of these travelers don’t know that they are eligible or understand how to pursue a valid claim. Our new tool will produce compelling content for today’s social media-driven consumers, while building a platform for automatic notifications about compensation eligibility. We’re excited to educate even more travelers about their rights in a fun, interactive manner with technology.”

AirHelp is compatible with both iOS and Android devices, and the new tool is currently available for folks using Gmail, Hotmail, and Microsoft Outlook servers. Other features in the AirHelp family include the Boarding Pass Scanner and Lara, the company’s A.I.-powered lawyer for those particularly contentious airline disputes.

Lulu Chang
Former Digital Trends Contributor
Fascinated by the effects of technology on human interaction, Lulu believes that if her parents can use your new app…
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