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38 new emojis could be coming in 2016, including bacon, selfie, avocado, ‘call me’

If you’ve ever thought that the world needs more emojis, you’ll be happy to know that a subcommittee of the Unicode Consortium agrees. Earlier this month, the group that standardizes the wonderful world of emoji recommended the addition of 38 new emojis in an update set to roll out in June 2016.

The Unicode emoji subcommittee (yes, such a thing exists) finalized and submitted a list of 38 new emojis for encoding in version 9.0 of the Unicode Standard, reports Yahoo Tech. “These symbols are considered for incorporation into Unicode for reasons such as compatibility usage, popular requests from online communities, and filling the gaps in the existing set of Unicode emoji,” according to the official document.

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If the proposed additions are approved by the Unicode Technical Committee’s vote, they will be part of the Unicode 9.0 update.

Here’s the list of the 38 new emojis up for consideration:

  • Face with cowboy hat
  • Clown face
  • Nauseated face
  • Rolling on the floor laughing
  • Drooling face
  • Lying face
  • “Call me” hand
  • Selfie
  • Raised back of hand
  • Left-facing fist
  • Right-facing fist
  • Handshake
  • Hand with first and index finger crossed
  • Pregnant woman
  • Face palm
  • Shrug
  • Man dancing
  • Prince
  • Man in tuxedo
  • Mother Christmas
  • Wilted flower
  • Scooter
  • Motor scooter
  • Octagonal sign
  • Clinking glasses
  • Black heart
  • Croissant
  • Avocado
  • Cucumber
  • Bacon
  • Potato
  • Carrot
  • Fox face
  • Eagle
  • Duck
  • Bat
  • Shark
  • Owl

The proposal document includes notes for each new emoji, which contains some entertaining tidbits. For instance, the emoji subcommittee says the left-facing and right-facing-fists can be used in tandem to create a fist bump.

This news comes shortly after the diversification of emoji skin tones in Unicode 8.0, which is already being implemented by the likes of Apple. Microsoft’s Windows 10 recently added a middle-finger emoji, which was part of Unicode 7.0.