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The best free parental control software for PC, Mac, iOS, and Android

Everything in this world has gone digital, and that includes homework if you have kids. If your children are young, you’re probably not giving them laptops or free reign of the family computer. You’re probably not always able to monitor their screen activity either.

That’s where parental control software comes in handy. Parental controls keep your kids safe from the dark web, and there’s a no-strings-attached version available for all operating systems. Keep reading to find out more.

Built-in OS features

Giving your kids technology designed for their age group is an excellent first step towards keeping them safe online. When they have access to more general computing devices, you can leverage parental control features built right into the operating system. The parental controls for both Windows and MacOS provide a convenient and acceptable means for restricting Web access and chat functionality, along with viewing detailed logs and monitoring email exchanges.

Windows Family Safety

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For Windows 10, you need to sign up for a Family Safety account. You can then add a specific child account (or more) to your family account that your kids can use.

This approach may be a little complicated, but it comes with a variety of benefits. You get activity reports for all online activity from the child accounts and can block any apps, games, or sites that you want.

For an idea of what apps are genuinely beneficial for kids, take a look at some of our favorites.

You can also limit how much time they spend on the account, and strictly control their purchasing activity. There are also some real-world safety features, including the ability to track your kids’ location as long as you use Windows mobile devices.

MacOS built-in parental controls

Macbook Air (2018) Review
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MacOS touts more than a few options when it comes to parental controls, each of which is accessible via the Parental Controls pane housed within the main System Preferences panel. The software includes options for blocking specified applications and websites. You can also block messages with particular people you deem inappropriate. Parental controls must be set individually for each person, but once done, users can also set time limits.

There are other options, such as the ability to hide profanity in most source content, and users can additionally prohibit the computer’s built-in camera and disc-burning utilities. If there’s more than one Mac on a single network, users can even remotely manage said parental controls from a different computer entirely. It’s a reasonably comprehensive solution if you don’t mind spending some time in Mac settings making sure everything is set up correctly. The catch is that you can only manage parental controls by the user, so you’ll need to set up separate accounts for each child.

Apps and extensions

Windows and MacOS offer a decent selection of parental controls, but they can’t do it all by default. In the same vein, parental controls can be a challenge to set up on child-focused mobile devices. Here are downloadable programs that may be more suited to your particular goals.

Qustodio (Windows/MacOS/iOS/Android)

Qustodio

Qustodio has a very intuitive, easy-to-use interface that allows you to sign up for the free version of its software in moments. You manage everything from the dashboard, which includes social media monitoring, individual time limits for internet use, games, or apps, and the ability to track text messages and calls on the right devices. The real-time internet filter can detect pornography, and makes sure that everything is blocked, even in private browsing modes.

Compatibility options are impressive since the software supports Kindle and Nook, as well as Windows, MacOS, Android, and iOS. However, Qustodio is trying to make as much money as possible with this program, so many features (like game blocking, location tracking, etc.) are locked behind paywalls. You can also only use the free version on a single device, which limits its applicability. Qustodio has a great set of features; we just wish more of it was available for free.

Kidlogger (multiple platforms)

Kidlogger is an excellent option if you’d prefer to be covert instead of proactive. Instead of blocking sites, Kidlogger automatically tracks keystrokes and web history, as well as program use (and it automatically saves any screenshots taken on the computer). When installed on a smartphone, the app also automatically logs any phone calls made, by number and by contact name. It is compatible with popular destinations like Instagram and Discord, where parents may want to pay close attention, and updates continue to add more compatibility for the service.

The free version of Kidlogger is OK, but the premium versions add some oomph, though some of its features are downright invasive. If you want to monitor your child’s phone conversations and record WhatsApp messages, Kidlogger can do that. Unfortunately, the app doesn’t have native password protection, so if you’ve got a smart kid, you could end up being the one getting caught. The app is available for Windows, MacOS, Android, BlackBerry, and iOS. Like Qustodio, a free account limits you to one device, while paid versions offer more protection.

Zoodles kid-friendly web-browser (Windows, MacOS, Android)

HTC/Zoodles

Zoodles takes the dramatic step of replacing the entire web-browser with one built around children. This software is especially suitable for really young kids just getting to grips with accessing content online. Zoodles combines a filtered online experience with a walled garden of promoted, child-friendly content.

Available on a variety of devices and operating systems, Zoodles offers games, books, videos, and access to other age-appropriate content, all customizable by parents. There are activity reports to see what your child spends time doing, as well as an adjustable “recommender engine,” which helps parents promote specific learning tools to their children through the application.

The normal free version stops there, but the advanced “premium” edition–$60 annually, or $8 per month — adds many more features, including time management options, storybooks, individual site blocking, multiple languages, and more. You can get a free trial of the premium mode if you want, but it will start to auto-charge your account. Zoodles is excellent for younger kids, but remember that older kids will quickly learn to work around it.

FoxFilter (Google Chrome/Firefox Add-on)

FoxFilter (Mozilla Firefox Extension)

FoxFilter is designed to provide users with a score of blocking filters based solely on individual keywords and sites (i.e., Playboy, lingerie, nude) while offering solutions for adding trusted sites to a curated list of forbidden content. Moreover, the add-on’s sensitivity settings can be tweaked to scan body content as well as the title and URL, and users can set notification and alert preferences detailing the type of content underlying each blocked site.

This preference managing is great for blocking a range of websites and is one of the fastest options to get up and running, but inexperienced users may want to stick with the pre-formatted list of warning words. Add the wrong keywords or too many keywords, and you may find nearly every website blocked. FoxFilter does offer free email support, so if you encounter any issues, don’t hesitate to contact them.

What’s next?

If you want full protection for your growing kids, you’re probably concerned about smartphone use, too. You should check out our list of the best control apps for your kid’s smartphone. And we bet some of you are also interested in learning more about security on gaming consoles.

Also, since you’ve made sure your kids are safe online, what about making sure your web activities are well protected too? Make sure you’re running a strong antivirus solution and keep your passwords shored up with our favorite password managers.

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