Machine learning improvements for Google Translate expand to more languages

google translate machine learning
Malarie Gokey/Digital Trends
Google has always been the go-to place for online translation, but it looks like the company wants to take things to the next level. In November, the company announced that it would use machine learning to improve the quality of translation offered by Google Translate. It began providing neural machine translation for nine languages, promising more to come, and now a few months later, it’s made good on that promise.

At launch last year, the languages included English, Spanish, Portuguese, French, German, Turkish, Chinese, Japanese, and Korean. But in a blog post on Monday, Google Translate head Barak Turovsky announced the availability of neural machine translation for Hindi, Russian, and Vietnamese, with “many more languages” to come. It will eventually be used in all 103 languages that Google Translate supports.

“With this update, Google Translate is improving more in a single leap than we’ve seen in the last 10 years combined. But this is just the beginning,” said Google in its original blog post. “While we’re starting with eight language pairs within Google Search, the Google Translate app, and website, our goal is to eventually roll neural machine translation out to all 103 languages and surfaces where you can access Google Translate.”

google-translate

According to Google, the system uses Google’s self-built tensor processor units, or TPUs, which help give the system a processing time that’s three times faster than on a CPU and eight times faster than on a GPU. Turovsky says the company can also use multilingual neural nets for languages that are similar linguistically.

Google has been putting a pretty heavy emphasis on machine learning, and that’s only likely to continue. Just recently, the company launched its new digital assistant, aptly called Google Assistant, which is artificially intelligent and aims to help users with day-to-day tasks in their digital lives — like conducting searches, managing calendars, and so on.

Article originally published in November 2016. Updated on 3-7-2017 by Lulu Chang: Added news of more languages added to neural machine translation capabilities. 

Product Review

Montblanc Summit 2 offers smart functionality but still looks good with a suit

Montblanc’s Summit 2 is the first smartwatch to use Qualcomm’s Snapdragon Wear 3100 processor. It’s feature packed, with GPS, NFC for Google Pay, and a heart rate sensor, but it also has the classic timepiece look.
Web

Google Translate updated to reduce gender bias in its translations

Google is changing how Google Translate offers translations. Previously when you entered a word like doctor, Translate would offer a masculine interpretation of the word. Now, Translate will offer both masculine and feminine versions.
Cars

Bosch is developing a Rosetta Stone for autonomous and connected cars

Bosch and start-up Veniam want to create a common language that autonomous and connected cars can use. The two firms have developed a connectivity unit that transcends the national boundaries of technology.
Mobile

Google confirms Allo chat app will shut down in 2019

Another day, another messaging app reportedly shutting down. Following reports of Google Hangouts shutting down, Google Allo might be next. While Google has yet to confirm, the tech giant may be putting an end to the chat app soon.
Computing

Windows 10 user activity logs are sent to Microsoft despite users opting out

Windows 10 Privacy settings may not be enough to stop PCs from releasing user activity data to Microsoft. Users discovered that opting out of having their data sent to Microsoft does little to prevent it from being released.
Computing

Intel's discrete graphics will be called 'Xe,' IGP gets Adapative Sync next year

Intel has officially dubbed its discrete graphics product Intel Xe, and the company also provided details about its Gen11 IGP. The latter will include adaptive sync support and will arrive in 2019.
Computing

Intel answers Qualcomm's new PC processors by pairing Core and Atom in 'Foveros'

Intel has announced a new packaging technology called 'Foveros' that makes it easier for the company to place multiple chips together on one package. That includes chips based on different Intel architectures, like Core and Atom.
Computing

Razer’s classic DeathAdder Elite gaming mouse drops to $40 on Amazon

If you're looking to pick up a new gaming mouse for the holidays, Amazon has you covered with this great deal on the classic Razer DeathAdder Elite gaming mouse with customizable buttons, RGB lighting, and a 16,000 DPI optical sensor.
Computing

Intel's dedicated GPU is not far off -- here's what we know

Did you hear? Intel is working on a dedicated graphics card. It's called Arctic Sound and though we don't know a lot about it, we know that Intel has some ex-AMD Radeon graphics engineers developing it.
Computing

Firefox 64 helps keep your numerous tabs under control

Mozilla officially launched Firefox 64 by placing new features into the laps of its users including new tab management abilities, intelligent suggestions, and a task manager for keeping Firefox's power consumption under control.
Computing

Here's our guide to how to charge your laptop using a USB-C cable

Charging via USB-C is a great way to power up your laptop. It only takes one cable and you can use the same one for data as well as power -- perfect for new devices with limited port options.
Computing

Apple MacBook Air vs. Microsoft Surface Pro 6

The MacBook Air was updated with more contemporary components and a more modern design, but is that enough to compete with standouts like Microsoft's Surface Pro 6 detachable tablet?
Computing

Installing fonts in Windows 10 is quick and easy -- just follow these steps

Want to know how to install fonts in Windows 10? Here's our guide on two easy ways to get the job done, no matter how many you want to add to your existing catalog, plus instructions for deleting fonts.
Computing

Email take-backsies! Gmail's unsend feature is one of its best

Everyone has sent a message they wish they could take back. How great would it be if you could undo that impulsive email? If you're a Gmail user, you can. Here's how to recall an email in Gmail.