Skip to main content

Samsung just figured out a way to make Wi-Fi five times faster

Samsung Galaxy Note Edge
Image used with permission by copyright holder
When it comes to Wi-Fi, it’s a tale of two speeds: the theoretical and the actual. Thanks to real-world stuff like walls and household appliances, the maximum network bandwidth you see on a router’s box remain more theory than reality — until now, if Samsung is to be believed. The technology giant claims to have developed a 60GHz Wi-Fi technology that will bridge the gap between theoretical and actual Wi-Fi speeds.

Samsung says its technology will open up the door to data transmission speeds of up to 4.6 gigabits per second (Gbps), or 575 megabytes (MB) per second. This would be about five times faster than the current ceiling for Wi-Fi speeds for consumer electronics devices, which stands at around 866 megabits per second (Mbps), or 108MB per second.

So, for example, a 1 gigabyte (GB) movie could be transferred between devices in fewer than 3 seconds, and uncompressed high-definition videos can be streamed from mobile devices to TVs in real time.

“Unlike the existing 2.4GHz and 5GHz Wi-Fi technologies, Samsung’s 802.11ad standard 60GHz Wi-Fi technology maintains maximum speed by eliminating co-channel interference, regardless of the number of devices using the same network,” claims Samsung’s announcement.

The company says it has solved the speed-killing issues that come with millimeter waves, which travel by line-of-sight and are stymied by walls and other obstacles, by making use of wide-coverage beam-forming antennae and micro beam-forming control technology, among other fancy-sounding things.

The company expects to integrate this new Wi-Fi technology in a wide range of products, including audiovisual devices, medical devices and telecommunications equipment. Samsung expects commercialization of the unlicensed 60GHz Wi-Fi band spectrum as early as next year, a bit later than expected.

Editors' Recommendations

Jason Hahn
Jason Hahn is a part-time freelance writer based in New Jersey. He earned his master's degree in journalism at Northwestern…
This dongle can bring a superfast Wi-Fi 6 connection to your old computer
The Netgear Nighthawk A8000 Wi Fi 6 adapter

To upgrade to Wi-Fi 6 you would customarily need to buy an entirely new laptop or replace the Wi-Fi card in your desktop. Netgear has come up with a clever way to avoid this. The Netgear Nighthawk A8000 adapter simply plugs into any USB slot and brings instant Wi-Fi 6 connectivity to your computer.

What it does is retroactively bring Wi-Fi 6 to older computers, allowing them to enjoy the same high bandwidth and speeds as brand-new top-of-the-line machines with Wi-Fi 6-capable receivers. It supports all three Wi-Fi bands -- 2.4 GHz, 5 GHz, and 6 GHz -- and can deliver blazing speeds of up to 1.2GBps, which is comparable to an ethernet connection. However, there is a catch.

Read more
Wi-Fi 7 officially hits 5Gbps, five times the speed of your current router
A Wi-Fi router with an ethernet cable plugged in.

Intel and Broadcom have collaborated on a Wi-Fi 7 demo ahead of its prospective 2023 certification, according to PC Gamer.

The two companies showcased the upcoming connectivity standards, successfully demonstrating 5Gbps speeds going between an Intel laptop and a Broadcom access point. The speeds are five times faster than Wi-Fi 6 and 2.5 times faster than Wi-Fi 6E. They also have the potential to get even faster as Wi-Fi 7 develops as an ecosystem, the publication added.

Read more
Intel could give us Wi-Fi 7 devices long before Apple gets around to it
Internals of Surface Laptop Studio.

Wi-Fi 7 may not exist in devices today, but that isn't stopping Intel from forging ahead with it. Intel is planning to introduce Wi-Fi 7 sometime in 2024 just as Apple turns to Wi-Fi 6E for its upcoming devices. Intel will be doubling down on Wi-Fi 7 development efforts over the coming year, according to Eric McLaughlin, Intel's vice-president of wireless solutions.

"We are currently developing Intel's Wi-Fi '802.11be' in order to obtain the 'Wi-Fi Alliance' certification, and it will be installed in PC products such as laptops by 2024," McLaughlin said in a press conference earlier today. "We expect it to appear in major markets in 2025."

Read more