Skip to main content

Are typing skills more important than handwriting lessons? Finland says yes

texting typing replace handwriting finlands schools kid
Image used with permission by copyright holder
How important is it that we teach our kids how to communicate using ink and paper? These days, typing away at a keyboard or a mobile smartphone is a much more common way of getting a message across, and in light of these new modern modes of communication, Finland has decided to remove cursive handwriting as a compulsory part of its school curriculum.

Instead, students will be taught keyboard typing and even texting skills. While these are undoubtedly useful in today’s jobs market — a faster typer is a more efficient  worker, after all — many will be sad to see handwriting cut out altogether. The changes will be introduced at the start of the fall term in 2016, and individual schools can still teach cursive handwriting if they wish to.

The teachers that the Savon Sanomat newspaper spoke to said that children would benefit from the changes to the curriculum, and that attention would be paid to those kids who may not have access to the same kind of modern-day gadgetry at home as their peers. Minna Harmanen, of Finland’s National Board of Education, said that fluent typing was an important “civic skill” that every child should learn.

Finland is one of the first countries to officially make handwriting lessons optional in favor of more time spent tapping away at keyboards, but it won’t be the last as we adapt to a different way of getting points across — the majority of schools in the U.S. have also voted to phase out cursive writing lessons. The question is, what will happen when a computer or tablet isn’t available and someone needs to leave a note?

[Header image courtesy of Zurijeta / Shutterstock.com]

David Nield
Dave is a freelance journalist from Manchester in the north-west of England. He's been writing about technology since the…
The Vision Pro 2 may already be dead
Apple Vision Pro

According to reports from The Information, Apple is working on a cheaper non-Pro version of the Vision Pro headset -- and hitting pause on the development of the next high-end model. These rumors come from people involved with the supply chain and manufacturing of the Vision Pro, who claim that Apple has told at least one supplier that it's stopping work on the next Vision Pro.

Just like any other Apple product with "Pro" in its name, the Vision Pro was always meant to be part of a lineup of multiple models, so it's not too much of a surprise that a cheaper model is in the works. What is surprising, however, is that there may not be a second generation of the Vision Pro released alongside it -- at least not anytime soon.

Read more
Whatever you do, don’t click this error if you see it pop up
A hacker typing on an Apple MacBook laptop, which shows code on its screen.

Hackers have devised a new, deceptive method to trick users into installing a malware named ClickFix, according to cybersecurity firm Proofpoint. The scheme involves enticing users with fake solutions to common errors in popular services such as Chrome, OneDrive, and Microsoft. Once users download and execute these "fixes" by clicking the Copy fix button, they unwittingly run a PowerShell or a Windows Run dialogue command that compromises their systems.

This dialogue installs a "root certificate" to flush the DNS cache, remove the clipboard content, show a fake message, and install an additional remote PowerShell script that does an anti-VM check before the info-stealer is installed. Various hacker groups, including those responsible for ClearFake, allegedly use this method. Proofpoint details how hackers exploit jeopardized sites by incorporating a malicious script handed over by Binance's Smart Chain contract on the blockchain to spread malware and infect susceptible Windows computers.

Read more
Samsung claims the next era of DRAM will be a ‘breakthrough’
A Samsung HBM3 memory chip.

Samsung is readying up some pretty groundbreaking tech: stacking memory on a CPU or a GPU to potentially drastically improve performance. Switching to this technique may affect performance, power efficiency, and capacity. Unfortunately, many of us will never directly experience the benefits of this, as Samsung is going to use its high-bandwidth memory (HBM), meaning we won't find it even in the best graphics cards available.

The tech in question involves a new 3D packaging method that belongs to Samsung's Advanced Interconnect Technology (SAINT) platform, with this latest iteration being dubbed SAINT-D. Each variant involves a different 3D stacking technology, with SAINT-S stacking the SRAM die on top of the logic die; SAINT-L stacking logic; and finally, SAINT-D stacking HBM memory on top of logic chips, meaning either CPUs or GPUs.

Read more