Skip to main content

Chinese government bans the use of Windows 8 on its PCs

windows 8 gets banned from use on chinese government computers
Image used with permission by copyright holder

The Chinese government has decided to ban the use of Windows 8 on its computers because of Microsoft’s decision to end support for Windows XP back on April 8. The move could be a significant blow to Microsoft’s business in the country.

Using a translation browser add-on, we were able to read the Chinese government notice that ordered the ban. The notice was compiled by the Central State Organs of Government Procurement Center, according to the translated text, which to us sounds like a body that specializes in equipment acquisitions for state agencies.

“All computer products are not allowed to install Windows 8 operating system,” the notice reads. We assume that this also applies to Windows 8.1, though the notice doesn’t make any reference to the refreshed version of Microsoft’s dual-UI operating system.

This is just the latest chapter in a tense relationship between the U.S. and China. The governments of both nations have regularly traded barbs pertaining to cyber-espionage, with each accusing the other of hacking into government networks illegally.

So, what will the Chinese government use in place of Windows XP, assuming that a significant migration effort takes place? Sure, there’s Windows 7, which will continue to receive support until 2020, but don’t count out Chrome OS. After all, the precedent has already been set, with UK government agencies swapping out their Windows XP PCs for Chromebooks. The London Borough of Barking and Dagenham cited significant cost savings as a reason for the switch.

Despite the fact that Windows XP is no longer supported, the operating system is still widely used throughout China. As of last month, roughly 70 percent of China’s 200 million PC users were running Windows XP-powered PCs.

Editors' Recommendations

Konrad Krawczyk
Former Digital Trends Contributor
Konrad covers desktops, laptops, tablets, sports tech and subjects in between for Digital Trends. Prior to joining DT, he…
Windows 11 is about to make RGB peripherals way easier to use
Switches on the Razer DeathStalker V2.

Windows 11 is finally creating a solution for the multitude of RGB apps that clutter most gaming PCs. The long-rumored feature is with Windows Insiders now through Build 23475, which Windows announced in a blog post on Wednesday.

The feature, called Dynamic Lighting, looks to unify all of the different apps and devices that use RGB lighting so you don't have to bounce between several different apps. More importantly, Microsoft is doing so through the open HID LampArray standard, which makes it compatible with a long list of devices. Microsoft says it already has partnerships with Acer, Asus, HP, HyperX, Logitech, Razer, and Twinkly to support Dynamic Lighting.

Read more
Someone just used ChatGPT to generate free Windows keys
A MacBook Pro on a desk with ChatGPT's website showing on its display.

ChatGPT is an incredibly capable piece of tech, with a huge number of interesting uses. But, perhaps inevitably, people have put it to use for less noble purposes. Now, someone has used it to generate valid Windows license keys for free.

The discovery was made by YouTuber Enderman, who used ChatGPT to create license keys for Windows 95. Why Windows 95? Well, support ended for it 20 years ago, so this was essentially an exercise in curiosity from Enderman rather than an attempt to crack more modern versions like Windows 11.

Read more
Yes, you can use both Mac and Windows — here are some tips to get started
The keyboard of the MacBook Pro 14-inch on a wood surface.

I'm not a typical Windows or Mac user. Where most people choose one operating system and stick with it, I use both Windows 11 and MacOS regularly, going back and forth daily depending on my workflow. And it's easier to do than you probably think.

I have a fast Windows 11 desktop with three 27-inch 4K displays, and I use that for all my research-intensive work that benefits from multiple monitors. But for writing simple copy, and for personal tasks, I use a MacBook Pro 14 M1 Pro simply because I like it so much. It's not MacOS that draws me to the machine, but its battery life, cool yet quick operation, excellent keyboard and touchpad, and awesome HDR display. To stay sane, I've worked out a few tricks and techniques to make the constant switching bearable. Here's what I've learned.
Adjust to your keyboards

Read more