Even rectal thermometers can connect to your smartphone now

Since everyone carries around a portable supercomputer (by yesteryear’s standards) in their pockets these days, more and more devices have added ‘smart’ functionality that allows them to connect together. Fitness trackers, sex toys, and yes, now even rectal thermometers can connect to your smartphone.

Although it might seem like an unnecessary feature, the ability to automatically send the tested temperature from the Kinsa Smart Thermometer to your phone is very useful. Not only does it save the thermometer having a display, helping keep its costs down, but it means it doesn’t need batteries or much internal electronics at all.

This makes it more durable, long-lasting, and lightweight.

Better yet, having it connected to a powerful smartphone lets you graph changes over time — perfect for ill children — and you can even share the information with groups, potentially letting you check that the patient’s temperature is normal. You can even map changes over time with other parents, perhaps allowing for early detection of spreading illnesses.

Related: Samsung putting finishing touches on fitness tracker that doubles as jewelry

All you have do to make the Kinsa Thermometer work is plug it into your smartphone’s 3.5mm audio jack and it automatically connects and downloads the latest temperature data. It can even give you tips on usage while it’s taking someone’s temperature, telling you to hold it still or change placement depending on where you put it.

Yes, while the Kinsa Smart Thermometer can be used rectally for a truly accurate reading, it can also be used orally or under the armpit — well, after a very thorough cleaning. Kinsa recommends soap and water or alcohol.

There’s even a couple of simple games built into the app so that your children can play while you are taking their temperature. You will need to use the optional extension cord however, as it may not reach to where they can see otherwise.

The Kinsa Smart Thermometer is available now from the official store at just $20, with free shipping and returns.

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