‘The Binding of Isaac’ won’t be available for the Nintendo Switch on day one

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It’s been confirmed that the Nintendo Switch version of The Binding of Isaac: Afterbirth+ will not be ready for the console’s debut on March 3. However, the game is still expected to be available before the end of March, and its physical release will include some extra bonuses to appease fans.

We already knew that the Switch version of The Binding of Isaac would boast reversible artwork and a pair of sticker sheets featuring characters and items from the game. Now, a blog post on the game’s official website has revealed that the package also includes an Isaac sticker and a 20-page instruction booklet.

Like the game itself, the instruction booklet takes a great deal of inspiration from The Legend of Zelda, originally released for the NES in 1986. Its cover and the illustrated instructions within clearly pay homage to the manual included with the game in its initial North American release.

It’s worth noting that these bonuses are only being offered as part of the Switch launch edition of the game. The blog post specifically states that the instruction booklet won’t be included in future pressings of the game, so fans need to act fast if they’re interested.

While these bonuses will likely help convince fans that the delay isn’t a big deal, the fact that The Binding of Isaac won’t be part of the Switch’s launch lineup is bad news for early adopters. The system’s starting library is already sparse, and even though the delay is minor, it’s a shame to see the array of titles available on day one shrink further.

However, if pushing The Binding of Isaac back to later in March helps Nintendo deliver a steady stream of new releases through 2017, this delay could benefit the Switch in the long run. There’s a big gulf between launch standout The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild and games announced for late 2017 like Super Mario Odyssey and Splatoon 2. Ports of tried-and-tested titles previously released on other systems could help bridge the gap.