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2 new Control games are in the works, Remedy road map reveals

Remedy Entertainment has released a new road map for the projects the company is currently on, including what is most likely a sequel to 2019’s Control, code-named Heron. According to Remedy, Heron is a “bigger” game set in the Control universe and is currently in the concept and prototyping stage.

Since Remedy is also working on a spinoff game of Control, code-named Condor, Heron‘s scale suggests that it is most likely a sequel. Condor is continuing along in the proof-of-concept stage.

Remedy’s road map, which was shared with investors, includes updates on its other projects as well. Crossfire X launched in February and while it wasn’t well-received critically, Remedy says it still has a dedicated team supporting it.

Alan Wake 2, which was announced last year and is now in full production, is currently set for a 2023 release. Interestingly, Alan Wake Remastered has not secured any royalty revenue yet during its first quarter of release as marketing and development expenses haven’t been recouped. Since Epic Games Publishing published Alan Wake Remastered, it’s unlikely that it will make its way onto Steam later on. The same could be true for Alan Wake 2.

While Remedy is mainly known for its single-player offerings, it is also working on a multiplayer live service game with Tencent, code-named Vanguard. Not much else is currently known about the project aside from its free-to-play nature, but Remedy says that development on it is making good progress.

Finally, Remedy announced last month that it had partnered up with Rockstar Games in order to remake Max Payne and May Payne 2: The Fall of Max Payne. Both games are currently in development in the concept phase, according to the road map.

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George Yang
George Yang is a freelance games writer for Digital Trends. He has written for places such as IGN, GameSpot, The Washington…
Alan Wake 2 is proof that more PC games need a potato mode
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Cauldron Lake nursery rhymes

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