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Death Stranding gets a Cyberpunk 2077-themed update on PC

The PC version of Death Stranding received a surprise Cyberpunk 2077-themed update this morning. The free download brings a new hacking mechanic, plus new items and missions, to the game.

The update adds a significant amount of content to Kojima Productions’ open world game. The biggest addition is a hacking system, which allows players to short-circuit enemies and vehicles. Hacking can also be used to disable MULE sensors, which alert enemies to players’ positions.

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— HIDEO_KOJIMA (@HIDEO_KOJIMA_EN) December 17, 2020

The new update adds six new missions to the game, which include characters and lore from Cyberpunk 2077.

In addition to the larger content, the update brings plenty of Cyberpunk 2077 cosmetics to the game. Players can grab a Reverse Trike with improved jumping power, Cybperunk-themed holograms, and wearable items like Johnny Silverhand’s sunglasses. Players can also get Johnny Silverhand’s robotic arm as a wearable item. A trailer for the update notes that the hand gives Sam Bridges increased power. He’s shown knocking out enemies with it.

Death Stranding has done collaborations like this in the past. When Half-Life: Alyx released earlier this year, the game added a Headcrab hat and gravity glove to the game. This update is more significant by comparison, bringing entirely new missions and mechanics to the game.

The update is currently available on the PC version of the game only, and players will need to update to version 1.05 to access it. The game is currently 50% off on PC to celebrate the update. Kojima Productions has not said if it will come to the PlayStatiom 4 version of the game in the future.

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Giovanni Colantonio
Giovanni is a writer and video producer focusing on happenings in the video game industry. He has contributed stories to…
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