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Epic Games is offering $100 million to game developers with no catch

Image used with permission by copyright holder

Epic Games is among the most profitable companies in the video game industries as the creator of the Unreal Engine and, of course, Fortnite. Its success has been so great over the last few years that Epic is pledging $100 million to help other developers create games — and there isn’t any catch.

Called “Epic MegaGrants,” the program commits $100 million to not just game developers, but media creators of any kind, as well as students, teachers, and tool developers. Individual grants will be anywhere from $5,000 to $500,000, and Epic does not require that it is the publisher, nor does it take ownership of any created intellectual property.

“At Epic we succeed when developers succeed,” CEO Tim Sweeney said in a press release. “With Epic MegaGrants, we’re reinvesting in all areas of the Unreal Engine development community and also committing to accelerate the open sourcing of content, tools, and knowledge.

Epic Games CEO Tim Sweeney Image used with permission by copyright holder

The types of teams Epic games is looking to offer grants include game developers using Unreal Engine 4, and those looking to move existing projects into the engine. The company is also looking for those making films or television with Unreal Engine 4, as well as those who might be using the technology for product design, advertising, or another form of enterprise.

Epic will also be offering grants to those who wish to port software tools into Unreal Engine, or “enhancements for existing open-source projects related to 3D graphics.”

That last line is the real kicker, as you don’t even need to involve Unreal Engine 4 in your project at all if you want to use another piece of software. As long as the grant is going toward something involving 3D graphics, you’re still eligible.

Epic Games will evaluate each potential project based on “quality and unique appeal,” and what it offers to the 3D graphics field. It’s open to international developers, and if your project was not accepted and you’ve made changes to it, you are welcome to resubmit your application. As of this time, there is no deadline, with Epic Games keeping the program open for as long as cash remains. If you’re interested, you can fill out the form of the official website.

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Gabe Gurwin
Former Digital Trends Contributor
Gabe Gurwin has been playing games since 1997, beginning with the N64 and the Super Nintendo. He began his journalism career…
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