Skip to main content

The average Android phone is now half the price of an iPhone

android way cheaper than ios price gap
Image used with permission by copyright holder

Ever look at the retail price of that smartphone you bought? The iPhone’s price is mostly profit, and lately, competition is getting much cheaper. Based on information released by IDC, throughout the last four years the average price of an Android device dropped like a rock. It’s now half as much as the average iPhone.

The International Data Corporation (IDC) is one of a number of analyst firms out there constantly monitoring tons of smartphone data including the pricing and performance. A recent report by the company (compiled by Statista) detailed the average price of a smartphone based on the two most popular operating systems: Android and iOS. As a result, it found that the average price of an iPhone, about $650, is more than double the price of the average Android smartphone, about $280.

This information is startling, but it doesn’t tell the whole story about what this means for the industry. Right now, Android makes up a wide majority of the worldwide market share with 78 percent of smartphones shipped in 2013 running the OS. At the same time, most of the phones being sold that run Android are not high-end devices like the iPhone 5S, they’re low to mid range devices equal or less than the stats of the iPhone 5C. As a result, this data is a little skewed. Even though the number is dropping, it’s irrelevant in most cases if you want a top of the line Android smartphone.

 A notable example of a cheaper, but still high-tier smartphone would be the Moto G, which costs at a fraction of the price of comparable devices. The Moto X (Motorola’s flagship phone) also went down in price to around $300.

In the end, these numbers are pretty irrelevant to anyone with a subsidized two-year phone plan, which offers a top-notch smartphone cheaper than even the average Android price. But these total costs are built into your monthly bill. Cheaper devices mean you may not need to lock yourself into a contract to afford a phone.

(Image via IDC)

Joshua Sherman
Former Digital Trends Contributor
Joshua Sherman is a contributor for Digital Trends who writes about all things mobile from Apple to Zynga. Josh pulls his…
I think I found the perfect iPhone screen protector
An iPhone 15 Pro with Anker screen protector on.

Every smartphone brand touts having some kind of protection for its phone displays, trying to convince you that you don’t need a screen protector. Samsung and Google use various versions of Corning Gorilla Glass, while Apple has its own Ceramic Shield glass. Durability-wise, these glass panels should be mostly resistant to scratches and scuffs and less likely to shatter if dropped.

But I’m here to tell you that if you’re anything like clumsy old me, then a simple screen protector can save you from a lot of unnecessary headaches.
My history of having butterfingers

Read more
I used the CMF Phone 1, and it’s 2024’s best smartphone bargain
A person holding the CMF Phone 1.

You’ve got to stick with me for a bit here, as there’s quite a lot of background to go through before we get to the meat of what makes this new Android phone such a bargain. The phone is the CMF Phone 1, and while you may never have heard of CMF, you will have heard of Nothing -- the company co-founded by Carl Pei of OnePlus fame. CMF’s full name is CMF by Nothing, and it's Nothing’s sub-brand responsible for very reasonably priced but little-known mobile products.

If, like me, you’ve barely paid CMF much attention (if any) until now, then it’s time to change that. Why? The CMF Phone 1 is the sub-brand’s first smartphone, and it’s quite simply the bargain of the year.
Shockingly good specs

Read more
How to fake the GPS location on your iPhone or Android phone
Google Maps on the Asus Zenfone 11 Ultra.

Modern smartphones have long been equipped with location-aware features that combine global positioning system (GPS) hardware with other features like Wi-Fi and cellular triangulation to help get an accurate fix on your location nearly anywhere in the world. These typically work very well, but what about those times you want your iPhone or Android smartphone to think it's somewhere else?

Perhaps you're trying out an app that searches for nearby stores or restaurants in another city, wanting to access services that are only available within a specific country or region, or playing a location-based game. Whatever the reason, sometimes it's useful to be somewhere else as far as your smartphone is concerned. The good news is that with the right tools, it's not difficult to spoof your GPS location.

Read more