It’s college decision time, and the Schoold app is here to help

Getting into college is hard. Just ask the over 95 percent of hopefuls who didn’t make it to Stanford this year. And while there’s no app that will cause an acceptance letter to magically appear in your mailbox, there is an app that seeks to make the whole application process a bit less painful and even help with your chances. Meet Schoold, the college search app that promises to help you “get a glimpse into your future.”

The app encompasses a number of different functions, including everything from discovering and improving your admission chances to finding all the best ways to finance the next four years of your life. Once you create a profile, Schoold will provide personalized suggestions and results, ultimately helping students and parents alike make some semblance of sense over what is often an overwhelming endeavor.

Heralded as a counselor, banker, and advisor all in one, the college and future planning tool has now been downloaded over half a million times, and has raised $4.5 million in seed money to boot. It’s an impressive achievement, considering the app was only launched a month ago — first on Google Play, and then to the iOS app store. “The rapid adoption that Schoold’s app is experiencing is a strong endorsement of our vision, approach and the underlying technology driving the product,” said Sourabh Ahuja, CEO of Schoold, in a statement. “We look forward to building Schoold into the de facto, go-to-app for students and parents alike.”

The app’s success comes at a convenient time for rising college freshmen, as April 1 often marks the day of reckoning for most college admissions decisions. As the month passes, anxious 18-year-olds will be weighing their options, and Schoold ought to provide another valuable resource.

“The choice of a college and a major literally sets the stage for a young person’s future career options, earning potential, and job satisfaction,” said Joe Ross, the app’s president and chief operating officer. “Schoold simplifies an unnecessarily confusing, complex process for students and families with a customized, intuitive app powered by rigorous data science.”

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