Skip to main content

Work or play: AT&T’s new ‘Toggle’ app lets Android users choose

Android-enterprise-ATT-Toggle
Image used with permission by copyright holder

AT&T announced today its new Toggle app, which aims to make it safer and easier for customers to use a single smartphone or tablet for both personal use and work by creating distinct modes for each. The service is currently only available for devices running Android 2.2 or higher, but will work with any service provider.

According to the press release, users will be able to send personal text messages, browse the Internet, play games and send personal emails in personal mode, then access their work email, business apps and calendars without the two worlds colliding.

Approximately 60 percent of companies now allow (or require) employees to use their personal smartphones for work purposes. AT&T says Toggle will make it easier for companies to manage employee devices by enabling their IT departments to “[w]ipe all corporate information stored in work mode if an employee leaves the company or loses his or her device.” That means, if your smartphone has Toggle installed, your company’s IT department can remotely access your device (presumably only the work mode side), and do whatever they like with the information.

While AT&T has thinly veiled Toggle as something that’s good for regular people – the press release is entitled “Go ahead – bring your own device to work” – it is actually only good for corporations and other types of employers. Toggle will make it easier for companies to require that employees use their own devices for work purposes – a highly effective cost-saving practice, but one that is unfair to employees as it requires them to spend minutes and data usage, often without financial assistance from their employer. It also gives companies a way around the sticky situation of accessing someone’s personal device when they want to meddle with the data.

Regardless of who benefits from Toggle, it’s clear who loses: BlackBerry. With Toggle, Android becomes a far more attractive OS for the enterprise, which has long considered BlackBerry its go-to brand. The enterprise’s move away from BlackBerry has already begun, but this app will surely expedite that migration.

AT&T says Toggle will be available later this year, but has not yet revealed pricing.

[Image via]

Editors' Recommendations

Andrew Couts
Former Digital Trends Contributor
Features Editor for Digital Trends, Andrew Couts covers a wide swath of consumer technology topics, with particular focus on…
This AI gadget let me speak in languages I don’t know or understand
Timekettle AI interpreter hub held in hand.

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy declares the "Babel" fish to be "probably the oddest thing in the Universe." It's described as a "leech-like" fish that fits into your ear, feeds off of the brainwaves in the surroundings, and then defecates inside your ear to produce sounds in a language that you understand. Effectively, it is a very gross and flagrant, but extremely sophisticated device for real-time translation.

Nearly half a century after Douglas Adams wrote the mind-bending and earth-shatteringly (literally) convulsive saga, the concept of a Babel fish still feels highly spellbinding. While we are still not so close to the brainwave-to-defecations level of immediate translations, a bunch of gadgets are chasing that problem in a much less disgusting way. Google's Interpreter mode and Samsung's Galaxy AI are prime examples of translation technologies that are readily available, but a few brands want to tackle the issue separately from the smartphone. Timekettle is one of those brands, and its latest X1 Interpreter hub is a handheld device that claims to do it differently (read: better) using AI.

Read more
Apple Music vs. Spotify: Which music streaming service is the best?
An iPhone with the Home section of the Spotify app on it.

When it comes to music-streaming platforms, two of the most renowned options are Spotify and Apple Music. Both services utilize sleek and intuitive user interfaces, while introducing plenty of features and enormous music libraries. You’ll also be able to enjoy Spotify or Apple Music on several different device types, including smartphones, tablets, laptops, smart TVs, and vehicle infotainment systems. But we bet you’re wondering: which of these two music must-haves is the real must-have?

To help you decide, we’ve put together this comparison of Spotify and Apple Music, focusing on criteria like price, features, and compatibility. We’ve picked a winner for each category, as well as an overall winner, which we present at the very end.

Read more
How to get Android apps on a Chromebook
Dell Chromebook 3189 2-in-1 on a classroom desk floating in the air.

Over the last few years, Android apps have been added to more and more Chromebook models. A brilliant expansion of the overall user experience, Google went ahead and integrated the Play Store into most Chromebooks made after 2019. This is the most convenient way to download an Android app or two, but if you own an older Chromebook, the machine may not have native support for downloading and installing applets.

To confirm this, we recommend referencing this extensive Android app support list from The Chromium Projects.

Read more