Skip to main content

Snapchat is coming to PC, but there’s a big catch

Snap just announced Snapchat for Web, a new way to stay in touch with friends while using a computer. Using Snapchat in a browser is surprisingly similar to how it works with the mobile app, yet Snap takes advantage of the larger screen to show a list of friends in a sidebar at the left. Both chats and video calls are available as early access features to paid Snapchat+ subscribers in the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Australia, and New Zealand. Eventually, the ability to use Snapchat from a computer will roll out to all Snapchatters, worldwide.

To use Snapchat for Web, you need Google’s Chrome browser and it’s best to update to the latest version. The browser version of Snapchat works with Windows, MacOS, and Chrome OS, so if you’re a Snapchat+ subscriber in a supported region, you should be able to log in right now on your computer’s Chrome browser at web.snapchat.com.

Here's what a Snapchat for Web Video Call looks like.
Image used with permission by copyright holder

Snap introduced Snapchat+ just a few weeks ago, a way to give priority access to new features to the platform’s most dedicated users. Top features include the ability to change the app’s icon, pin a friend to the top of your chat history, and see who rewatched your story. As new features are added, there could be a few wrinkles that arise that need to be ironed out over time.

As with Snapchat’s mobile app, Snapchat for Web is oriented toward creation, opening on the camera screen so it’s easy to take a quick Snap to share with a friend throughout the day, without taking a phone off the charger. You can now make Snapchat video calls in the browser with up to 16 people taking full advantage of your larger screen.

Snapchat for Web is here!

Snaps, chats, and video calls are available now with more features arriving over time. Lenses are a priority and will be coming soon. Being able to use Snapchat from a computer will likely keep more people engaged throughout the day and should help the social network continue to grow.

Editors' Recommendations

Alan Truly
Computing Writer
Alan is a Computing Writer living in Nova Scotia, Canada. A tech-enthusiast since his youth, Alan stays current on what is…
Apple just gave Mac gamers a big reason to be excited
Craig Ferguson introducing Mac Gaming at WWDC.

When Apple announced it would revolutionize the world of Mac gaming at its Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) in June, many people were skeptical. But the latest update to the company’s Game Porting Toolkit has made some important changes to how games run on the Mac -- and the results are impressive.

The toolkit allows developers to move their Windows games across to macOS Sonoma. Games makers can test out how well their products run on Apple’s hardware and find out what they need to do to make the jump, something that Apple says ends up “significantly reducing the total development time.”

Read more
MacBooks may finally catch up to Windows laptops in this one important way
Apple's 15-inch MacBook Air on a desk, with macOS Sonoma running on its display.

MacBooks have been on a roll lately, and in a lot of ways, they've made it difficult for Windows laptops to keep up. Dollar for dollar, they tend to be faster, longer-lasting, and more feature-rich machines.

There's been one blatant feature missing from Macs, though: Face ID. Despite plenty of rumors over the years, Apple has continued to leave Face ID off the MacBook. We've been asking for it for years now, but Apple can be stubborn with stuff like this.

Read more
There’s a MacBook that Apple has no right to continue selling
A stack of MacBooks is pictured from the top down.

With the launch of the new 15-inch MacBook Air, Apple has solidified its most fleshed-out Mac lineup in recent memory. There's a MacBook for almost every conceivable budget and use case, ranging from the $999 M1 MacBook Air up to the upper echelons of the 16-inch MacBook Pro.

Considering how well the 15-inch MacBook Air has been received in early reviews, there doesn't appear to be a bad choice in the mix. That is, until you stumble upon the MacBook hidden in the lineup that Apple has continued to sell for absolutely no reason. I'm referring to the 13-inch MacBook Pro, of course.

Read more