How to recall an email in Gmail after hitting the send button

The instantaneous delivery of email comes with consequences. Most importantly, once you send an email, you might not be able to take it back. That could cause problems if you send a message when you aren’t ready — or send it to the wrong people.

The good news is that Gmail provides a quick, effective way to unsend or recall an email before the worst happens. This brings the email back and keeps it from appearing in anyone’s inbox until you are ready. Here’s how to use the feature on both mobile and the web.

Recalling an email on iOS or Android

how to recall an email in gmail undo send

Recalling an email on iOS or Android is extremely simple, and doesn’t require you to tweak any settings or options. After sending an email, you’ll see the option to Undo sending it at the bottom of the screen. Hit that button, and you should be good to go. Note that the button will only show up for a few seconds before you won’t be able to undo sending the email.

We recommend sending a test email to see if this feature works for your account before you rely on it. Google is still rolling it out to customers with Android devices, so you may not have it just yet.

Recalling an email on desktop

Step 1: Check your unsend settings

In the past, you had to enable the Unsend option to recall Gmail emails. However, Google has made this a standard feature for Gmail, so it’s now always on. But you should still check the settings to make sure it’s properly customized.

Start by signing into Gmail with your account. and then select the gear icon in upper-right corner, just above your email list. From this menu, select Settings.

Step 2: Adjust settings if necessary

The settings menu holds all the special features you can activate or adjust in Gmail. Scroll down the General tab until you see the Undo Send section. Here, you will see an option to adjust the Send cancellation period. You can choose to recall an email up to 5, 10, 20, or 30 seconds after you sent it.

Gmail Cancellation Period

If you are worried about sending the wrong email, you probably want to set the cancellation period to at least 10 seconds, just to be safe. Five seconds isn’t very long to realize you made a mistake and hit the unsend option. When finished, scroll to the bottom of the Settings section and save your changes.

Gmail Save Changes

Note that the email may show up in the inboxes of those you sent it to while the unsend option is present. Recalling the email will make it disappear, but it’s possible that someone could have started reading it, so it’s still important to act quickly.

Step 3: Send a test email

Now that you know how long you have to recall an email, it’s time to test the service out. Hit “Compose” and address a quick email to yourself. When you are ready, hit the blue “Send” button.

Gmail Undo Email

Now, immediately look in the lower left corner of your Gmail window. You should see a quick sent notification pop up there that says “Message sent” and gives you an option to view the message or create a new one. In the middle of the notification bar will be an option to “Undo.”

If you wait, you will see this Undo option vanish. That means that your cancellation period has ended and it is now too late to recall the email. If you aren’t sure how long to set your cancellation period for, we suggest you try this several times just to get a feel for how long different periods last.

Hit the Undo option, and you will see that your email pops back up in the same state it was when you sent it. This allows you to freely change the content or address it before sending it as intended. Once the email has been recalled, there’s no time limit on how long you have to work on it — or you can simply delete it and start over.

You may also want to check out other tips and tricks for Gmail here.

Mobile

Dozens of bite-sized features add up to a feast in Android 9.0 Pie

Google’s latest version of Android is here, and it’s called Android 9 Pie. We’ve been using it for the past few months on a Google Pixel to see how this flavor stacks up.
Computing

Smart Reply not smart enough? Desktop Gmail users can soon opt out

Google will soon give desktop Gmail users the ability to opt out of Smart Reply. If you'd prefer to compose a short email the old-fashioned way, you can do so without seeing the auto-generated suggestions in the future.
Computing

PDF to JPG conversion is quick and easy using these simple methods

Converting file formats can be an absolute pain, but it doesn't have to be. We've put together a comprehensive guide on how to convert a PDF to JPG, no matter which operating system you're running.
Social Media

New to Snapchat? Follow our guide and go from newbie to pro

Whether you're a Snapchat addict or a newbie, our detailed Snapchat guide will help you become a pro in no time. Find out how to get started, spice up your snaps, chat, send money, and carry out a host of other useful actions.
Computing

Newegg was cracked, customer data has leaked, and security is clearly scrambled

Online electronics retailer Newegg has found themselves at the heart of an online security breach as the company's payment system was breached, giving hackers of the notorious group, Magecart, potential access to confidential customer data…
News

Winamp media player might be back from the dead, with Windows 10 support

Winamp might be back from the dead, and it's bringing support for Microsoft Windows 10 with the first new software release since its acquisition by Radionomy in 2014. Fans of the media player will also enjoy new features and bug fixes.
Computing

Heavily overclocked RTX 2080 Ti steals every 3DMark record

Nvidia's RTX 2080 Ti is already the most powerful graphics card ever released, but with liquid nitrogen cooling overclocker Kingpin was able to push the card to new heights and break a bunch of records in the process.
Computing

Photoshop isn't required to resize images. Here are 6 ways to do it in seconds

Resizing an image isn't the toughest thing in the world, even if it may seem like a hassle. Here's how to resize an image using six tools that allow you to make quick work of any photo, regardless of your operating system.
Computing

Chromebook keyboard showcase may have leaked Pixelbook 2 images

As we approach Google's #madebygoogle event taking place in early October, new rumors and leaks for a possible Pixelbook 2 are appearing online. This latest one may show what the rumored Nocturne design will look like.
Virtual Reality

Walmart stocks its stores with VR training for its employees

Walmart will begin rolling out virtual reality training experiences to all of its stores this year with the power of Oculus Go. More than 6,300 stores will receive the new technology, helping the company train its employees.
Computing

Tap Strap wearable keyboard gains support for VR applications

TAP System's wearable keyboard gains support for virtual reality, now compatible with Windows Mixed Reality, Oculus Rift, and HTV headsets. Type and tap for up to eight hours in VR without needing to look at a physical keyboard.
Computing

Wi-Fi vulnerability could allow attackers to steal your data on unencrypted sites

A 20-year-old security flaw in the design of the Wi-Fi standard and how computers communicate using the transmission control protocol could allow hackers to perform a web cache poisoning attack to steal your data and login information.
Deals

Walmart takes $380 off the MacBook Air for a limited time

Walmart is offering a steep discount on the MacBook Air. Though the $380 discount is lovely, this offer comes with an extra charger to sweeten the deal. If you're looking to pick up an Apple MacBook for less, now is an excellent time.
Computing

Documentation shows data recovery possible for Macs with T2 coprocessor

New documentation from Apple shows that data recovery is indeed possible for Macs with T2 Coprocessor thanks to internal diagnostics software, giving users of the 2018 MacBook Pro new hope in the event of a system failure.