Compare the gravity on different planets with the Space Museum desk toy

Whether you view it as an educational tool or a geeky space-themed desk toy, there is something incredibly cool about Kristoph Krisjans’ latest Kickstarter campaign. Having previously created the “Moondrop” fidget toy to simulate how gravity affects objects on the moon, Krisjans is now casting his gravitational net a bit wider to let you compare gravitational forces on all eight planets in our solar system.

To do this, the so-called “Space Museum” tabletop display is composed of eight different, precisely machined planetary spheres of equal size, but different weights, intended to represent each planet’s gravity. The Earth unit acts as a kind of control, against which you can compare every other sphere.

Each sphere is made of the same high-grade aluminum (with the exception of the super heavy Jupiter ball, which is stainless steel), but different ones have differently sized hollows in the center so that they weigh the correct relative amounts. It’s a fun demonstration of just how much gravity fluctuates between planets — brought to life in a way that no textbook can quite manage.

While we haven’t yet been able to lay our hands on a Space Museum kit, the high-quality finish looks equally well thought out — with each laser-engraved sphere anodized a different color, based on planet photos from NASA to achieve the correct color tones. The spheres also come in a collector’s case inspired by the toned-acrylic glass used in astronaut helmet visors.

“I believe that whether you are a passionate space enthusiast or just want to discover more about outer space, Gravity Museum would create an exciting way to explore the universe,” Krisjans told Digital Trends. “It would also be a great way to present the science and space exploration to the young generation. It is much easier to excite a person by showing them the physical process than by telling the theory behind it.”

If you want to get hold of a Space Museum of your own, you can currently pre-order one on Kickstarter, with prices starting at $92. Shipping is set to take place in March — if you can … weight that long.

Emerging Tech

Awesome Tech You Can’t Buy Yet: Robo sidekicks, AC for your bed, and more

Check out our roundup of the best new crowdfunding projects and product announcements that hit the Web this week. You can't buy this stuff yet, but it sure is fun to gawk!
Gaming

The best PS1 games of all time

Take a stroll down memory lane with the 50 best games ever released for the original PlayStation.
Product Review

The Even H3 Wireless headphones offer custom sound, but have their quirks

The Even H3 Wireless offer similar looks and the same custom tuning as their slightly larger predecessor, but they aren’t without their own special quirks when it comes to day to day usability.
Gaming

The best Xbox One games (August 2018)

More than four years into its lifespan, Microsoft's latest console is finally coming into its own. From 'Cuphead' to 'Halo 5,' the best Xbox One games offer something for everyone.
Emerging Tech

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe sets out to try and ‘touch’ the sun

A NASA probe launched on a journey to take measurement of the atmosphere of the Sun, hopefully uncovering crucial details about the origins of the solar winds generated there.
Emerging Tech

The Perseid meteor shower peaks this weekend! Here’s how to watch

Thanks to a new moon, 2018's Perseid Meteor Shower will be much easier to view, with even the dimmest meteors observable by the naked eye. Here's how to see the show this weekend, and where the views will be the best.
Emerging Tech

‘Rogue medicine in a bathtub’: 4 experts on the vice and virtue of pharma hacking

A biohacker, pharmahacker, and two bioethicists walk into a bar. We ordered them a metaphorical round and had a chat about the risks and rewards of DIY medicine — from unsanctioned gene therapy to medication made on the kitchen counter.
Emerging Tech

Don’t get burned! How to back crowdfunding projects the smart way

In the world of crowdfunding, there’s no such thing as a sure thing. There's a million reasons why a project might fail. But with this handy guide, you'll be able to spot the signs of a sketchy project and decrease your chances of getting…
Emerging Tech

Stanford A.I. can realistically score computer animations just by watching them

Researchers at Stanford University have developed a computer system that’s able to synthesize realistic sounds for 3D animation, based entirely on its knowledge about the physical world.
Emerging Tech

No keyboard? No problem. Masterkey will project you a virtual one to type on

Miss having a physical keyboard when you're out and about? Wish you could have a mobile display bigger than your smartphone can offer? Masterkey 4.0 is a wireless projector that promises to help.
Cars

You don’t need to go autonomous to make trucking safer

Long haul truckers are very good at their jobs, but they face long hours and unpredictable conditions. Autonomous tech may be coming, but here’s how lidar technology companies are working to enhance trucking safety today.
Emerging Tech

Be a master of your own ever-changing ‘galaxy’ with this kinetic wall art

Art Machine is a stunning work of kinetic art that looks like a continuously swirling galaxy or turbulent weather formation viewed through a ship's porthole. Check it out in all its glory.
Emerging Tech

Omega Centauri hosts 10 million stars and probably not an ounce of life

Omega Centauri is about 16,000 light years away, making it visible to the naked eye. And it contains some 10 million stars, making it the largest globular cluster in the Milky Way. But it probably doesn't have an ounce of life.
Emerging Tech

The world’s first practical quantum computer has cash and a timeline

The dream of building a practical quantum computer could be closer than ever, thanks to a $15 million grant from the National Science Foundation to seven universities around the United States.