A ‘Dark Souls Remastered’ network test will begin on May 11

Dark Souls Remastered launches on Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and PC  later this month, giving action-role-playing fans the chance to play the massively influential game with a shiny new coat of paint and some extra features, and if you’re a console player, you’ll be able to take part in the game’s “network” test next week.

On May 11 and May 12 — next Friday and Saturday — Bandai Namco will be hosting the Dark Souls Remastered network test on PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. These will be two separate tests, each running for three hours on the two days, and will be used to measure “various functions of the online system.” For you, however, that just means a few hours to try out the game for free.

Because of the small window for actually playing the game during the network test, Bandai Namco is allowing players to download the game client in advance. You can install it from now through May 7 on Xbox One, and until May 8 on PlayStation 4. The total download size is about 3GB, so you won’t have to free up too much space on your storage device ahead of time.

The network test will take place in the Undead Parish area, which is very early on in Dark Souls Remastered. Though it shouldn’t pose too much of a threat to veterans, this will be your chance to try the game out at 4K resolution (on PlayStation 4 Pro and Xbox One X) and 60 frames per second, and it includes access to the six-person multiplayer, expanded from the original game.

Not included in the network test is the Nintendo Switch, which was recently delayed until an unspecified date this summer. That version of the game will also have a network test at some point, but Bandai Namco hasn’t given a final date as of yet. The Solaire of Astora Amiibo figure originally scheduled to launch with the game on May 25 has also been delayed, so you’ll have to wait to “praise the sun” for a little bit longer.

Dark Souls Remastered is out for Xbox One, PlayStation 4, and PC on May 25. We’ll be purchasing extra controllers to replace the ones we expect to break ahead of time.

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