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Genshin Impact comes to Epic Games Store this month

Free-to-play action RPG Genshin Impact is headed to Epic Games Store on June 9, as revealed by the game’s official Twitter account today. It was previously already available on PC via the Genshin Impact website, as well as mobile devices, PS4, and PS5.

Epic Games Store users will get a “special gift” by using the redemption code GenshinEpic, as an incentive to hop aboard on that platform. This Epic version will feature cross-play, so players will be able to play with one another regardless of platform.

Dear Travelers,

The adventure begins again, as Genshin Impact will come to the Epic Games Store on June 9, 2021 (UTC+8) at:https://t.co/8eB2avWiZo

Paimon has also prepared an in-game redemption code as a special gift to help Travelers on their new journey: GenshinEpic pic.twitter.com/GUhImzbuZ0

— Paimon (@GenshinImpact) June 2, 2021

Genshin Impact took the industry by storm in 2020, after coming to PS4 and mobile devices. Fans fell in love with its open world, action gameplay, and “gacha” elements. Despite being free, the game’s developer miHoYo implemented a monetization tactic known as a “gacha” mechanic. This allows players to spend real money in-game to acquire a random set of characters, cosmetics, and items. This keeps players coming back and incentivizes them to spend money.

Since its launch, it managed to gross $60 million after only one week on the market. As of October 2020, it was the highest-grossing game of the month, with most of its generated revenue coming from Japan, China, and the United States. As of March 2021, Genshin Impact grossed over $1 billion.

Genshin Impact recently launched for PS5, which features faster load times and 4K support. It’s also planned to launch for Nintendo Switch, though its release date has yet to be announced. To hold players over until then, miHoYo will update the game with content drops that feature extra rewards and gear to unlock in-game.

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Joseph Yaden
Joseph Yaden is a freelance journalist who covers Nintendo, shooters, and horror games. He mostly covers game guides for…
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