Want to live forever? Ray Kurzweil thinks that may be possible very soon

When rock band Queen asked us “Who wants to live forever?” back in 1986, we interpreted it as standard lyrical rhetoric. But now, three decades and what feels like light years in technological, medical, and scientific advances later, the answer to that age-old question may have changed. And according to Ray Kurzweil, the famous American inventor who has been described as the “rightful heir to Thomas Edison,” we’re nearing immortality.

As the man responsible for the first CCD flatbed scanner, the first omni-font optical character recognition, the first print-to-speech reading machine for the blind, the first text-to-speech synthesizer, the first music synthesizer, and much more, Kurzweil has a knack for spotting trends and anticipating the future. And if history is any indication (and his word stays true), we may be in for a long, long lifetime.

In an episode of PBS’s News Hour last week, Kurzweil noted that death, which he describes as “a great robber of meaning, of relationships, of knowledge,” will soon be conquered. Indeed, the futurist notes, our species will soon be able to defeat disease and degeneration, and live “indefinitely.”

Reflecting on the massive leaps and bounds technology has made in the last few years, Kurzweil says that immortality is no longer a pipe dream. While we’ve spent the last several millennia rationalizing death, Kurzweil says, we no longer have to resign ourselves to this supposedly inevitable fate. Referring to the “exponential growth of information technology,” the inventor also predicted the appearance of computers the size of blood cells in the not so distant future, which would be able to make their way through our bodies and connect to the cloud. All this, he says, is a “2030 scenario.”

It’s all, in a strange way, part of the cycle of life, Kurzweil suggests. After all, as the human race has progressed, we’ve continuously extended our life expectancy — naturally, the next step is an essentially infinite number of years. In 10 or 15 years, he claims, we’ll be able to all but eliminate breakdowns in the body, or at the very least, depend less upon the physical self. Our thinking will reside partially in the cloud, allowing us to spread out our existence over various media. “If part of it gets wiped away, we’ll be able to re-create it,” he says.

So live your best life now; soon enough, it may be one that lasts into eternity.

Product Review

Equal parts tool and toy, the Lensbaby Edge 35 bucks photographic tradition

The Lensbaby Edge 35, part of the Composer Pro optic swap system, creates tilt-shift-like blur without the tilt-shift price. Made for photographers who want find tradition boring, it opens up new ways to work with blur.
Gaming

Here’s how to slay Grim Matchstick the dragon in Cuphead

Cuphead's arrival on Nintendo Switch means a new swath of players will get to meet Grim Matchstick, the fiery dragon who drastically raises the difficulty in the outgoing stretch. Our guide will help you slay the dragon for good.
Gaming

You're not a true fan without these Nintendo Switch exclusives

Who doesn't love a good Nintendo game? If you're looking for great first-party titles for your Nintendo Switch, take a look at our list of the very best exclusives available right now.
Mobile

Google and Huawei offer to pay owners up to $400 for Nexus 6P bootloop fault

Anyone who suffered from the Nexus 6P's dreaded bootloop and can prove it may be in for a financial windfall. Google and Huawei have offered to pay up to $400 to those who purchased the Nexus 6P before a certain date.
Health & Fitness

Microsoft says it’s closing its HealthVault patient records service

Microsoft has announced it is closing its HealthVault service, which offered a way for individuals to store and share their health records with medical professionals. Users are advised to act soon if they want to save their data.
Health & Fitness

Competitors question Trek’s claims about its new bike helmet tech

Trek's new WaveCel helmet technology is being called into question by competitors MIPS and Koroyd, neither of which have been able to verify the claims of vastly improved safety results that trek claims.
Wearables

The ultimate golf watch isn’t a smartwatch. It’s Hublot’s Big Bang Unico Golf

Forget golf smartwatches, the Hublot Big Bang Unico Golf is the ultimate timepiece to wear out on the links. It's the world's first mechanical golf watch, and will keep score for you throughout the game.
Emerging Tech

Chinese doctors use 5G to perform surgery from hundreds of miles away

The surgeon behind your future life-saving surgery might not have to be in the same room as you. Heck, thanks to the burgeoning 5G revolution, they might not have to be in the same state.
Health & Fitness

Latest version of Closca’s collapsible bike helmet is made for urban explorers

Closca has updated its bike helmet with a new lightweight, collapsible design that is available in a variety of color combinations and has been built with the urban rider specifically in mind.
Health & Fitness

From the office to the gym, these are the best smartwatches for fitness

The line between smartwatch and fitness tracker continues to blur. To help narrow the field of the best fitness watches, we sifted through what's available and curated a list of devices worthy of a spot on your wrist.
Emerging Tech

Awesome Tech You Can’t Buy Yet: Halfbikes, VR for all your senses, and more

Check out our roundup of the best new crowdfunding projects and product announcements that hit the web this week. You may not be able to buy this stuff yet, but it's fun to gawk!
Deals

The best sound machines to help you fall (and stay) asleep

Whether you find that sleep better with white noise, rain sounds, or deep sleep music, there’s a sound machine on the market that will be able to help you catch more z’s in no time at all.
Deals

Stay fit and save cash with our top 10 affordable Fitbit alternatives

As much as we love Fitbits, they're rather expensive. If all you want is a simple activity tracker, however, then check out these great cheap Fitbit alternatives. With offerings from brands like Garmin, you don't need to pay full price.
Emerging Tech

Scientists manage to 3D print an actual heart using human cells

Scientists at Tel Aviv University have achieved a world-first by 3D printing a small-scale heart, complete with blood vessels, ventricles, and chambers. Here's why that's so exciting.