No, Amazon Day isn’t yet another shopping event, but you may find it useful

If you’re an avid online shopper and a fully paid-up Prime member, then Amazon Day may well be the feature you’ve been holding out for.

No, Amazon Day isn’t an excuse for another sales holiday like Prime Day. Instead, it’s a new delivery option giving regular Amazon shoppers the chance to choose a specific day of the week for all of their items to be delivered.

Spotted by CNET, Amazon Day is currently an invite-only offering, but hopefully, it will be rolled out to one and all following the completion of its trial period.

It works like this: Whenever you order something from Amazon during any given week, simply select the same day for delivery upon checkout and all of your items will show up at your door then, instead of in dribs and drabs on different days.

The option is currently showing available for select users alongside the usual options, such as one- or two-day delivery.

For customers, it could be a real boon, especially for regular Amazon shoppers who are wary of porch pirates and therefore want to be home to receive multiple items at once.

For Amazon, grouping deliveries together for customers should make for a more efficient delivery system, though if the majority of shoppers choose Saturday and Sunday as their designated day, it could add unwanted pressure to its logistics operation.

And for the environment, the benefits include cutting down on waste if several items can be packaged together, with the number of delivery trips also reduced.

Amazon isn’t revealing much about its new delivery option at the current time, saying only that the company is “always innovating and looking for new ways to surprise and delight our customers,” and that it’s happy to be trying out “a new service aimed at making the delivery experience more convenient for customers.”

Depending on their location, Amazon shoppers already have a number of ways to get hold of their ordered goodies, including Amazon lockers and brick-and-mortar pick-up hubs. You can also have a delivery person leave the package inside your home if you’re out when they turn up, or, if the idea of a stranger entering your abode leaves you feeling a little uncomfortable, there’s also an option for delivery to the trunk of your car.

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