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Google TV rolls out its first updates

dualview_2Google TV has had a challenging start. With content providers jumping ship and wary reviews, it seemed like maybe the product launched just a little too early. But it’s rolled out the first round of updates, and while they aren’t going to solve any of the device’s major problems, they certainly bring a few new things to the table and highlight a bit of what Google TV is capable of. Here’s a short roundup of what’s in store.

  • Updated Netflix app lets you access and watch Netflix’s entire library without any help from your PC.
  • On the Netflix note, you can now actually watch movies instantly. Before the update, you had to use a separate device in order to add content to your instant watch queue and now, you really can just go through the catalog and choose “watch instantly.” On the flipside, if you prefer a physical DVD sent to your home, you can now do that as well.
  • Dual view is being introduced, and will let users watch TV and browse the web at the same time on a remarkably clean and user-friendly interface. It also allows you to move and resize your browser window.
  • There’s a new remote control app for Android, which also uses integrated voice search if you don’t feel like pressing any buttons at all.

Check out the video for a little more insight and some previews of the updates.

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Molly McHugh
Former Digital Trends Contributor
Before coming to Digital Trends, Molly worked as a freelance writer, occasional photographer, and general technical lackey…
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