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Amazon execs talk Woody Allen series, Transparent Season 2 release date

Transparent, the Amazon’s Golden Globe winning series about a family adapting to their transgender father, got a debut date for its second season today at the Television Critics Association event. The series second season will premiere on December 4, according to Variety. Also notable from today’s Amazon Studios’ TCA panel: the untitled Woody Allen series will launch in the second half of 2016.

Related: Amazon orders up a third season of critical darling Transparent

During the panel, Transparent creator Jill Soloway explained the genesis of the series. “It was very personal. The show was kind of writing itself in my mind, almost immediately after my parent came out,” said Soloway according to Variety. “I’ve been a TV writer for 10 or 15 years, writing pilots every year and kind of just dreaming about having a show that mattered. I used to go to on pitch meetings and say, ‘I want to write something that’s never been written before and write something that’s going to change the world.'”

As for insight into the second season, Soloway explained that the writers didn’t spend as much time delving into the basic issues that the trans community faces due to our changing society. “It’s kind of mind-blowing how our culture has caught up.”

Reporters also grilled Amazon Studios chief Roy Price on Woody Allen’s upcoming series, even delving into the director’s past child molestation allegations by his daughter. “I think you have to look at the whole picture,” said Price according to The Hollywood Reporter. “Our focus is on the fact that he’s a great filmmaker and storyteller and we look forward to the show in 2016.”

Little has been revealed about the plot of Allen’s six-episode television series, but the acclaimed actor and director previously noted that he wishes he didn’t take on the project.

“It was a catastrophic mistake for me,” said Allen according to The Guardian in May. “I’m struggling with it at home. I never should have gotten into it. I thought it was going to be easy. You do a movie and it’s a big long thing; to do six half hours you’d think it would be a cinch. But it’s not: it’s very, very hard.”