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Best camera deals for August 2022

Smartphone cameras may be shockingly good, but they don’t measure up to the best digital cameras. Professionals and hobbyists alike still use full-size mirrorless and DSLR cameras. Cameras have only gotten better in recent years thanks to new technologies like Full HD and 4K video recording capabilities. Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connectivity are now standard even on entry-level models. To save you the hassle of hunting around for them, we’ve smoked out the best cheap camera deals and bundles right here.

Even those entry-level cameras will set you back hundreds while the best cameras from brands like Canon and Nikon can sail well into four figures. That’s why it behooves any aspiring photographer to hunt for a discount. There are Canon camera deals and GoPro deals, if you’re hunting for something specific. If you’re new to all this, we’ve also put together a quick camera buying guide to help you make the right choice.

Today’s best cheap camera deals

With its built-in zoom lens and great shooting capabilities, the Panasonic Lumix FZ80 is a great point-and-shoot camera for hobbyist photographers who don't require interchangeable lenses. more
With a great body design, flip-up flash module, large viewscreen, and 40x optical zoom capabilities, the Kodak PixPro AZ401 is a nice (and affordable) upgrade over most cheap point-and-shoot cameras. more
This point-and-shoot can camera capture vibrant and colorful photos at 4K quality. You can even make adjustments in-camera and instantly share images with Wi-Fi connectivity. more
A full step above a beginner's outfit, this kit has two lenses and a Speedlite flash. You can learn a lot with this setup's capabilities and turn out beautiful work. more
The Panasonic Lumix G85 is an excellent camera that offers heavyweight photo-taking power without the premium price, making it a great camera for newcomers to veterans. more
You can bank on the Nikon Z7 FX-Format Mirrorless Camera to capture priceless moments even if it's a matter of a split second. Pictures also appear vibrantly crisp even in low-light conditions. more
This Canon EOS deal is for the camera body only, with no lens or other equipment or accessories. This is a higher-end camera for experts or professionals capable of 4K or time-lapse Full HD video. more
If you want an affordable instant camera and aren't a stickler for maximum quality, the Canon IVY Cliq+ is a great budget-friendly option that can fit in your pocket with ease. more
Here's a simple point-and-click pocket-size camera that prints on 2-inch by 3-inch stickers. You can also use the Cliq2 for selfies and store images on a microSD memory card (card not included). more
If you don't need an unnecessarily grand digital camera, the Kodak PixPro FZ43 can take 16-megapixel photos with a 4x zoom for high-resolution images even from up-close without breaking a $100 budget. more
This is the lowest price we've seen for this excellent point-and-shoot camera, and it probably won't last long. Comes bundled with a bunch of accessories plus Corel photo editing software for MacOS. more
The Canon EOS R Mirrorless Camera has an impressive autofocus and electric viewfinder that allows you to see stills and videos as it is while the Flashpoint Zoom Speedlight aids in lighting. more

DSLR cameras

Modern DSLR cameras have perhaps the widest range of features, capabilities, and — naturally — price points. Entry-level models can be had for around $300 or even less if you buy refurbished units. High-end professional-grade cameras run well north of $2,000 — or much more once you consider the different lenses and accessories that are available). Serious hobbyists and professionals have long favored these cameras, which feature a reflexing mirror (“DSLR” stands for “digital single-lens reflex”) that reflects the image of what you’re pointing at directly into the optical viewfinder.

This mirror then simply flips out of the way to reveal the imaging sensor when you shoot, giving you an accurate and immediate photograph of your subject without the lag that occurs with mirrorless and point-and-shoot camera sensors. The digital single-lens reflex imaging systems require very little power, so your camera’s battery can last a long time before needing to be recharged or swapped out (swappable batteries are a bonus if you carry your camera around all day).

DSLRs are not as dominant as they once were due to the growing popularity of mirrorless cameras, but they are still the most popular type of camera aspiring photographers look for when they’re in the market for their first “real” camera. With great entry-level options and ongoing camera deals, there’s never been a better time than now to shop for a DSLR.

Mirrorless cameras

At first glance, mirrorless cameras look much like their DSLR counterparts, and they are used for much the same purpose — taking clear, super-detailed, professional-quality photographs. What sets the mirrorless camera apart from DSLRs primarily is their imaging system. Simply put, mirrorless cameras lack the reflexing mirror found inside DSLRs, hence their name. Mirrorless cameras, however, still boast many of the same features and functions as DSLRs, such as the ability to use interchangeable zoom lenses.

High-quality mirrorless cameras are newer than DSLRs and have greatly increased in popularity in recent years. Instead of using a reflex mirror that covers the image sensor until the picture is taken, a mirrorless camera uses a sensor exposed to light, and thus “sees” your subject, at all times. This lack of an internal reflex apparatus means that mirrorless camera bodies are often relatively compact. As mirrorless camera technology has matured and caught up to DSLR designs, many serious hobbyists and professionals now prefer them.

Point-and-shoot cameras

A point-and-shoot camera is probably what most people think of when they hear “digital camera.” These units are typically compact and more pocket-friendly than larger DSLR and mirrorless cameras. They’re ideal for times when your smartphone camera won’t cut it, but you don’t want to be lugging a bulky DSLR around, making them a good choice for vacations, family get-togethers, and other occasions where you’ll be taking a bunch of pictures but photography itself isn’t your primary aim.

Point-and-shoot cameras are also typically cheaper than professional-grade models, although the best ones with more advanced features can definitely be pricey. Point-and-shoot models are a good option for people who want better-than-smartphone photos but aren’t interested in pursuing photography as a serious hobby or career.

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