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Best camera deals for January 2023

While we may all carry a camera in our pockets at all times, thanks to our smartphones, they don’t measure up to the best digital cameras shot for shot. Professionals and hobbyists alike still use full-size mirrorless and DSLR cameras to capture exceptional quality photos and panoramics. Cameras have only gotten better in recent years thanks to new technologies like Full HD and 4K video recording capabilities. Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connectivity are now standard even on entry-level models. To save you the hassle of hunting around for them, we’ve smoked out the best cheap camera deals and bundles right here.

Even those entry-level cameras will set you back hundreds while the best cameras from brands like Canon and Nikon can sail well into four figures. That’s why it behooves any aspiring photographer to hunt for a discount. There are Canon camera deals and GoPro deals, if you’re hunting for something specific. If you’re new to all this, we’ve also put together a quick camera buying guide to help you make the right choice.

Today’s best cheap camera deals

Canon Ivy CLIQ+2 Instant Film Camera — $80, was $100

Canon

If you love taking pictures but you hate waiting for the photos to get printed out, you’ll want to invest in an instant camera like the Canon Ivy CLIQ+2. It’s ultra-compact, so it can slip into your pocket, and it won’t take up a lot of space in your bag. Whenever there’s a moment that you wish to capture, just point and shoot with the camera, and your photo will be printed in a matter of seconds. The printer offers various customization options, including frames and color filters, so you can freely choose before you print your pictures. For those who take lots of selfies, the Canon Ivy CLIQ+2 comes with a 2.0-inch selfie mirror.

Panasonic LUMIX G7 Mirrorless Camera — $500, was $700

Credit: Les Shu/Digital Trends

The Panasonic LUMIX G7 is capable of taking photos and recording videos at 4K resolution, powered by a 16.0MP Live MOS sensor with a primary color filter that produces lifelike hues and a supersonic wave filter that keeps the sensor dust-free. The mirrorless camera also offers a burst shooting mode that takes pictures at 8 frames per second, so you won’t miss a shot even during sporting events and other fast-action situations, while its white balance controls will help you deal with different lighting conditions. The Panasonic LUMIX G7’s 3.0-inch TFT-LCD touch monitor also gives you complete control over the framing of your shots, which you can store on either SD, SDHC, or SDXC memory cards.

Canon EOS 2000D Rebel T7 DSLR bundle — $387, was $409

Best DSLR cameras for beginners Canon Rebel T7i
Daven Mathies/Digital Trends

The Canon EOS Rebel T7i might be on Digital Trends’ list of the best DSLR cameras as the best option for beginners, but the newer and cheaper Canon EOS Rebel T7 is also a worthwhile purchase, especially with this discount that makes it even more affordable. The camera comes with the EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 standard zoom lens that’s designed with Canon’s optical image stabilizer technology, which works best for taking pictures of scenes that require fast autofocus such as sports matches. The Canon EOS Rebel T7 is powered by a 24.1MP CMOS sensor that allows it to perform well even in low-light situations, and it can also record videos in Full HD resolution. But most importantly, this bundle includes a bevy of accessories such as a carrying bag, 64GB Sandisk Ultra SD card, a cleaning set, lens cover, and much more.

Canon EOS R10 Mirrorless Camera — $1,000, was $1,100

The Canon EOS R10 Mirrorless Camera on a white background.

Canon is one of the most trusted brands for mirror cameras — the Canon EOS R5 is in Digital Trends’ list of the best digital cameras as the top option for a full-frame mirrorless camera — so you know that you’ll be enjoying amazing quality with the Canon EOS R10. It comes with an RF-S 18-45mm f/4.5-6.3 IS STM lens that’s great for everyday shots, ranging from closeups to landscapes, and it features a lightweight and compact design that makes it easy to carry and hold in your hand. The Canon EOS R10 features a mechanical shutter that can shoot at 15 frames per second to capture moments without motion blur, and a 24.2MP CMOS sensor that can deliver photos with stunning resolution.

Nikon D850 DSLR (Renewed) — $2,035, was $2,797

Nikon D850
Hillary Grigonis/Digital Trends

The Nikon D850 is a full-frame DSLR that’s powered by a 45.7MP CMOS sensor, with a speedy 153-point autofocus system that quickly tracks and locks onto the subject of your shot so you will be able to capture fast-action shots such as during sporting events. The camera is also capable of capturing videos in 4K Ultra HD resolution with its intelligent image sensor that reduces rolling shutter distortions. The Nikon D850 also features a sturdy and weather-sealed design, so it’s the perfect companion when you want to take photos during outdoor adventures. This model is Amazon renewed/refurbished, and is fully-functional with an excellent condition rating — no signs of cosmetic damage that’s visible from 12 inches away. It has also been professionally inspected, tested, and cleaned by Amazon qualified vendors.

DSLR cameras

Modern DSLR cameras have perhaps the widest range of features, capabilities, and — naturally — price points. Entry-level models can be had for around $300 or even less if you buy refurbished units. High-end professional-grade cameras run well north of $2,000 — or much more once you consider the different lenses and accessories that are available). Serious hobbyists and professionals have long favored these cameras, which feature a reflexing mirror (“DSLR” stands for “digital single-lens reflex”) that reflects the image of what you’re pointing at directly into the optical viewfinder.

This mirror then simply flips out of the way to reveal the imaging sensor when you shoot, giving you an accurate and immediate photograph of your subject without the lag that occurs with mirrorless and point-and-shoot camera sensors. The digital single-lens reflex imaging systems require very little power, so your camera’s battery can last a long time before needing to be recharged or swapped out (swappable batteries are a bonus if you carry your camera around all day).

DSLRs are not as dominant as they once were due to the growing popularity of mirrorless cameras, but they are still the most popular type of camera aspiring photographers look for when they’re in the market for their first “real” camera. With great entry-level options and ongoing camera deals, there’s never been a better time than now to shop for a DSLR.

Mirrorless cameras

At first glance, mirrorless cameras look much like their DSLR counterparts, and they are used for much the same purpose — taking clear, super-detailed, professional-quality photographs. What sets the mirrorless camera apart from DSLRs primarily is their imaging system. Simply put, mirrorless cameras lack the reflexing mirror found inside DSLRs, hence their name. Mirrorless cameras, however, still boast many of the same features and functions as DSLRs, such as the ability to use interchangeable zoom lenses.

High-quality mirrorless cameras are newer than DSLRs and have greatly increased in popularity in recent years. Instead of using a reflex mirror that covers the image sensor until the picture is taken, a mirrorless camera uses a sensor exposed to light, and thus “sees” your subject, at all times. This lack of an internal reflex apparatus means that mirrorless camera bodies are often relatively compact. As mirrorless camera technology has matured and caught up to DSLR designs, many serious hobbyists and professionals now prefer them.

Point-and-shoot cameras

A point-and-shoot camera is probably what most people think of when they hear “digital camera.” These units are typically compact and more pocket-friendly than larger DSLR and mirrorless cameras. They’re ideal for times when your smartphone camera won’t cut it, but you don’t want to be lugging a bulky DSLR around, making them a good choice for vacations, family get-togethers, and other occasions where you’ll be taking a bunch of pictures but photography itself isn’t your primary aim.

Point-and-shoot cameras are also typically cheaper than professional-grade models, although the best ones with more advanced features can definitely be pricey. Point-and-shoot models are a good option for people who want better-than-smartphone photos but aren’t interested in pursuing photography as a serious hobby or career.

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