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Test your video game knowledge with these Wordle clones

By now anyone who’s on the Internet knows what Wordle is — whether you’re glued to Twitter or not. It’s a word-based puzzle game that involves guessing a five-letter word within six tries. Created by software engineer Josh Wardle and later purchased by The New York Times, Wordle has been massively popular this year.

So popular, in fact, that it’s spawned an endless amount of “inspired by” games and clones. Several of those variants revolve around video games, testing players’ knowledge of different franchises. If you’re looking to put your gaming expertise to the test, here are some daily games you might want to add to your rotation.

Squirdle

Squirdle is a Pokémon-themed take on Wordle. Given eight tries, players start out by guessing the name of a Pokémon. They’re given a line of clues that tell them things like if the Pokémon generation is right and if the types are correct. Since its debut earlier this year, Squirdle has had over 100 guessing challenges and seen a recent update from creator Sergio Esquival that added in a streak-tracking system.

Today marks Squirdle's 100th daily guessing challenge! To celebrate, I've added a simple streak tracking system to the game, which may or may not work!🎉

I hope people keep having fun with it❤️ pic.twitter.com/oopsh3Ee8A

— Sergio (@fireblend) April 21, 2022

Videogame Heardle

Videogame Heardle is a clone of Heardle, which is an homage to the original Wordle with a twist. Instead of guessing words, players have to guess a daily song within six tries based on the first sixteen seconds. Videogame Heardle takes that idea and lets players guess a randomly chosen song from a video game. Past daily songs have included music from Catherine, Bastion, and Super Mario Land.

You’ll need to know a wide range of games to come out victorious on this one. I’ve found it to be a little challenging since there are a number of games that I just don’t know

made videogame heardle. based on code by @joywavez and the original @Heardle_app. still updating it but atm there's over a month of songs in it, give it a go and tell your friends why not.https://t.co/2UqSJ2SFgh

— g0m (@g0m) April 18, 2022

Xenoblade Heardle

With the recent release date announcement for Xenoblade Chronicles 3, it made total sense that at least oneXenoblade Wordle variant would come around. Xeno Heardle, much like other remixes of the original Heardle, randomly chooses a song from the Xenoblade Chronicle’s discography for players to guess once a day.

And if one Xenoblade-themed Heardle isn’t enough for you, there are three Xenoblade-themed Heardles to choose from.

https://t.co/VyaBTAK7ZFhttps://t.co/uEafkp5teRhttps://t.co/22nhX0QVrk

Xeno Heardle links for those interested. 🥰

— KH, Asleep until July 29th 😴 (@TheMonadoBoy_) April 29, 2022

Fortle

Wordle for Fortnite fans takes shape in Fortle. Just like Wordle, players get six attempts to guess a five-letter word correctly — but all words are related to Fortnite. Released in early April, players are still sharing their daily Fortle attempts on Twitter.

The Fortnite daily word game, Fortle, is now live. Please report any bugs via DM.https://t.co/vzaGFl2R5Q

— Fortle – Fortnite Word Game (@Fortlegame) April 12, 2022

Kingdom Hearts Heardle

A new addition to the Heardle clone list, KH Heardle gives players a randomly selected song from the Kingdom Hearts’ discography to guess. This one in particular has given me some great challenges since I know where in the game a song will be from, but actually naming the song is difficult. It’s the perfect game to hold you over until Kingdom Hearts 4 launches.

Sonic Heardle

Released in mid-April, Sonic Heardle prompts players to guess a wide variety of songs featured in Sonic titles ranging from Sonic Adventure all the way to Mario & Sonic at the Olympic Games Tokyo 2020. A detailed explanation behind the game is available that goes on to discuss where creator Turquoise Coast is pulling songs from, including unused tunes and songs from other adaptations like the early ’90s animated series.

Similar to KH Heardle, there’s enough of a challenge here even for hardcore fans that might not be able to immediately place a song title.

I've seen a few people request a Sonic Heardle, so I went ahead and made onehttps://t.co/cwpJDKJLNR

I'm not super experienced in HTML (most of this is remixed code from Joywave Heardle, whose creator made a helpful tutorial), so let me know if there are issues!#SonicHeardle

— Turquoise Coast (@LaughAndPeace11) April 16, 2022

Yordle

Yordle gets its name from a race of spirits from League of Legends. This Wordle clone has players guessing the names of League of Legends champions in six tries. Originally shared on Reddit by creators Verevyta and uKruel, Yordle features a different number of letters each day to match the length of the various different champion names.

High Score Day

Cuphead appears as a clue in High Score Day.
Image used with permission by copyright holder

High Score Day is a Wordle-style game that goes beyond just guessing a word or song from a video game franchise. Each day players are given five screenshots from different video games. They have to guess the title of the game each screenshot is from. According to the site, with each correct guess players gain an extra life. If you guess wrong, you lose a life. Game titles listed in the submission box range from Dreamcast games to titles like Ghost of Tsushima and Fire Emblem: Three Houses.

Other video game themed Wordle and Heardle clones include:

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