At this point if you can’t improve at basketball, you’re the problem

evo one and hoop tracker basketball

We noted earlier this summer the arrival of a truly smart basketball, the 94Fifty from InfoSports Technologies, which uses embedded sensors to measure everything from shot arc, release times, backspin, speed of and power of dribble, and so on. Players can then view the data wirelessly on a smartphone or tablet. 

Boom! Feedback.

But sometimes you’re just a man and a hoop, trying to improve your shot. For those who want a responsive experience without having to stop training, the Evo One by Shooters Revolution might just be the trick. No external gadgets required. Inside the ball is a sensor calibrated to measure optimal backspin rate, axes, and balance of the ball during a shot. When a player’s hoist hits that rotational sweet spot, he gets audible feedback from the ball (a Galaga-esque chirp) to reinforce the proper technique. Shoot improperly, and the ball mocks with its silence.   

Evo OneShoot like Joakim Noah, and it cries. 

One very cool feature of the Evo One? The sensor is removable, so once a player is done training and wants to ball up with some buddies, the ball shuts up. Because, frankly, it could get annoying otherwise. 

Then again, sometimes you don’t care what the ball looks like as it goes in, you just want to know when it does, and from where. Enter Hoop Tracker, from Wireless Sports. Before taking the court, a player straps what looks like your basic sports watch to his non-shooting hand. A shot detector housing an internal 3-axis accelerometer is attached magnetically to the rim, with the help of a provided 55 inch “mounting pole” (which they may want to re-name). From there, the watch and shot detector work wirelessly up to 45 feet, monitoring every attempt from around the floor, noting a make or miss and calculating a percentage. 

The watch stores up to 10 separate shooting sessions, and all the data can be transferred to a computer via USB and tracked over time through HoopTracker.com, making it easy to recognize strengths and weaknesses. Customizable training programs are available, as well. 

All told, given the proliferation of products designed to help improve your game without a specialized coach, if you still can’t better only one step remains: 

Take up tennis. 

Emerging Tech

By studying patient data, A.I. can limit toxicity in cancer treatment

In a bid to improve quality of life for cancer patients, a team of researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have turned to machine learning to help avoid toxicity from cancer medications.
Photography

These point-and-shoot cameras make your smartphone pics look like cave paintings

If your smartphone camera just isn't giving you the results you're looking for, maybe it's time to step up your game. The latest and greatest point-and-shoot cameras offer large sensors, tough bodies, and long lenses - something no phone…
Home Theater

If you've got questions about Ultra HD Blu-ray, we've got answers

Ultra HD Blu-ray discs and players are a killer way to beef up your home theater. Here's everything you need to know about one of the most significant advances in home entertainment to arrive in years.
Home Theater

The best MP3 player you can buy (and four alternatives)

Want to go for a run, but your phone is weighing you down? No worries. Can't fit your whole music library on your smartphone? Don't sweat it. Check out our list of the best MP3 players, and find one that works for you.
Home Theater

Everything you need to know about Google’s Chromecast and Chromecast Ultra

Google's Chromecast plugs into your TV's HDMI port, allowing you to stream content from your tablet, laptop, or smartphone directly to your TV. Here's what you need to know about all iterations, including the 4K-ready Chromecast Ultra.
Health & Fitness

This cycling computer has a ‘surprise me’ feature for finding random routes

The Mio Cyclo 210 cycling computer is a feature-packed option for road cyclists and mountain bikers, and even comes with a "surprise me" option for finding alternate routes based on time, distance, and destination.
Emerging Tech

Cotton and corn! Reebok’s newest sneaker is ‘made from things that grow’

Keen to move away from using oil-based materials to make its footwear, Reebok has turned to cotton and corn for its latest sneaker. No dyes have been used to color the shoes, either, and the packaging is 100 percent recyclable.
Mobile

No, blue light from your cell phone won’t make you blind

A new study from the University of Toledo reveals the process by which blue light impacts the photoreceptors in our eyes and leads to macular degeneration, an incurable eye disease that causes blindness later in life. The fact that blue…
Mobile

Is Google launching an A.I. fitness coach for smartwatches?

Google is reportedly working on a health and well-being coach for Wear OS devices. Known as "Google Coach," the assistant will be able to suggest workouts, meal plans, and more, based on a user's activity.
Emerging Tech

Scientists try to trick brains of amputees with phantom limb syndrome

New research might help some amputees better mesh what they see with what they feel. In a recently published paper, researchers show how an amputee’s brain can be tricked into believing a prosthetic hand belongs to their own body.
Emerging Tech

Genetically engineered bacteria paint microscopic masterpieces

By engineering E. coli bacteria to respond to light, scientists at the University of Rome have guided it like tiny drones toward patterns that depict Leonardo da Vinci’s masterpiece, the Mona Lisa.
Home Theater

Soul Electronics’ new earbuds act as your personal running coach

Soul Electronics is no stranger to fitness-focused earbuds, but its new Run Free Pro Bio use a new gait-analysis technology to measure how you run, effectively acting as your own personal running coach.
Emerging Tech

VR experience shows caregivers what it’s like to live with Alzheimer’s disease

Los Angeles-based VR startup Embodied Labs has developed a virtual experience that puts users in the shoes of a person with Alzheimer’s disease, the most common type of dementia in the U.S.
Emerging Tech

Awesome Tech You Can’t Buy Yet: inflatable backpacks and robotic submarines

Check out our roundup of the best new crowdfunding projects and product announcements that hit the Web this week. You can't buy this stuff yet, but it sure is fun to gawk!