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Most people don’t want the new Apple Watch, according to a new survey

apple watch to come with power reserve time only mode hands on 7
Image used with permission by copyright holder
Apple may still be basking in the glow of fame and glory since announcing its new Apple Watch on Tuesday, but not everyone thinks the smartwatch is so hot. A new survey by Tolunda QuickSurveys of 1,000 Americans suggests that, among other insights, that most people are “very unlikely” to buy the new Apple Watch.

Most don’t want the new Apple Watch

The highlight of Tolunda’s survey comes from its questions about Apple’s unveiling of the new Apple Watch during its iPhone 6 and 6 Plus keynote. While the 1019 respondents mostly said they were “impressed” by the Apple Watch, the majority said they were still unlikely to buy it. Some 36 percent said they definitely would not buy the Apple Watch, 20 percent said they would probably not, and only 10 percent of respondents said they’d definitely buy the new Apple Watch. This response is a far cry from the standing ovation that the Apple Watch received from its audience in Cupertino’s Flint Center.

Related: Hands on: Apple’s watch changes everything. Or does it?

The survey did not ask specifically why its respondents did not want the new Apple Watch, but there are certainly several possible reasons, including its price, square shape or that most people are not yet ready for smartwatches. Tolunda’s survey did note, though, that most people either have “no opinion” on the new smartwatch’s overall design, or that it doesn’t look “much different from other smartwatches.” No particular feature of the Apple Watch stood out as the best among respondents, though many said they did like the size of the device, its health features, and customization.

The iPhone 6 remains a hit

While the Apple Watch didn’t receive much praise from the survey, the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus still impressed the survey’s respondents.  According to Tolunda’s Survey, 53 percent of respondents were impressed by their first look at the pair of smartphones, which will hit stores next week. Some 42 percent also said they were satisfied by the new features, feeling the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus are worthy successors to last year’s iPhone 5S and 5C.

When it comes to features, it seems the larger screen and faster 802.11ac Wi-Fi connectivity were the two most popular features on the new iPhones. Despite being one of the most popular features though, 63 percent would still buy the 4.7-inch iPhone 6, as opposed to its larger, 5.5-inch cousin. It seems in any case that customers like having a sense of choice in size.

Related: Apple makes it official, announces 5.5-inch iPhone 6

One final interesting piece of information from the survey is about conversion. Of the respondents who own an Android device, only 9 percent said they’d be willing to switch, suggesting that the majority who like and want the new iPhone are already iPhone owners themselves.

Tolunda’s survey went out less than 24 hours after Apple’s event, when it was fresh on everyone’s mind. Still that doesn’t mean the sentiment about either the iPhone 6 or Apple Watch will change once release day comes around. We’ll only know how well these gadgets sell once they hit the stores and we’re able to review the devices ourselves. It does seem that the Apple Watch, despite the hype, still has to prove its worth to consumers. Feel free to check out Tolunda’s infographic of the survey results below.

iPhone 6 survey inforgraphic
Image used with permission by copyright holder

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Joshua Sherman
Former Digital Trends Contributor
Joshua Sherman is a contributor for Digital Trends who writes about all things mobile from Apple to Zynga. Josh pulls his…
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