John R. Quain

John R. Quain

John R. Quain writes for The New York Times, Men's Journal, and several other publications. He is also the personal technology columnist for FoxNews.com and is an on-air reporter for CBS News Up to the Minute. His articles have appeared in Esquire, Rolling Stone, PC Magazine, PC World, and Entertainment Weekly. Quain is a member of the International Consumer Electronics Show advisory board.

Digital Trends Team

Articles 37
Top Categories
Articles
Emerging Tech

Delivery robots are poised to invade our cities, but are we ready for them?

Across the United States, small startups and big businesses alike are clamoring to swarm city streets with fleets of autonomous delivery robots. The only problem? Our urban areas aren't always well-equipped to accommodate them
Features

Smart city planners are rethinking parking by getting rid of it

What will parking look like in smart cities of the future? Will we even need parking spaces? As more people are deserting car ownership, planners are coming up with concepts for parking.
Emerging Tech

Singapore uses its smart city tech to help citizens cut through the red tape

Like many governments, Singapore’s puts citizens through plenty of red tape. But as part of its smart-city initiatives, the government is using tech to remove layers of bureaucracy.
Emerging Tech

In smart cities, 5G won’t just lessen congestion, it could save lives too

We all know 5G wireless networks are part of a smart city plan, but how will they benefit? When it comes to cars, it could help with congestion. For citizens, it could keep them safe and alive.
Cars

Driving Daimler’s 40-ton eCascadia big rig isn’t just fun, it’s electrifying

Daimler Trucks brought its all-electric eCascadia semi-truck to the 2019 CES, and invited us to take the wheel. What does it feel like to drive one? Simply electrifying, of course.
Emerging Tech

Today, hacks are annoying. In future smart cities, they could kill

Corporate security breaches are becoming so common that people now accept them as part of a digital future. But for smart cities, system hacks could prove far dangerous for citizens.