Skip to main content

Check your calendar with a glance at this smartwatch

There’s been a lot of talk about the direction smart wearables will take. The consensus is wearables need to blend into our lives instead of standing out like a sore thumb  – or a clunky watch with a split-second’s battery life and a thousand functions. The Calendar Watch by What? Watch Company takes a minimalist approach to smart gear by focusing on one thing: displaying your calendar. The public must approve, because the Calendar Watch Kickstarter campaign was just fully funded.

Calendar Watch focuses on doing one thing well, and helps its wearers do the same.

Calendar Watch is worth a nod for hiding smart tech in what seems at first glance like your grandfather’s watch — a classic, attractive timepiece. It has a traditional look that may appeal to people who are turned off by the modern one-dimensional touchscreens of most smartwatches.

So far, the watch and app work with Calendar, Google, Outlook, Facebook events, Yahoo, and Yandex. The user’s calendar, synced through the Calendar Watch app, is displayed by alternate shading on the e-paper watch face under analog hands and numbers. An appointment from 2-3 for example, would turn that hour dark on the watch’s face.

There are two display modes for Calendar Watch: fixed and flexible. Fixed mode only updates the display every twelve hours, and you set the update hour in the app. This works well to track the average work day. Flexible mode updates segments every 15 minutes, so the next 12 hours are always displayed. A double tap on the watch displays the next 12-24 hours for five seconds in both modes. A triple tap syncs the time and schedule with your phone. Calendar Watch confirms with vibrations, and an animation for the forced-sync. It will also vibrate for notification alarms set within the app.

Besides allowing users to sync their calendar and adjust the watch’s display settings, the app connection keeps the watch on local time, even when you travel to a different time zone. Since most of the functions are carried out through the app or by simply tapping the face, the result is a clear but subtle incorporation of modern technology into the time-honored aesthetic (pun-intended).

Calendar Watch’s iconic design, conceived by art director Masashi Kawamura and industrial designer Umberto Onza, features a stainless steel casing and domed sapphire. The bands are all leather quick-release with stitching to compliment the black, silver, or aqua blue faces. They’re close to adding a verdant green model – a 155,000 Euro stretch goal.

The battery lasts for about three weeks, so Calendar Watch provides a easy way to follow your calendar even if your phone dies or – heaven forbid — you leave it behind. When the watch is running low on battery, the second hand will slow its movement increments to five seconds at 10 percent, and to 15 seconds at five percent. It does come with a charging station that What? Watch will present on the Calendar Watch Kickstarter page.

Keep in mind, Calendar Watch is more of a mono-feature watch. It’s not a fitness tracker, or a remote for your smart phone. It focuses on doing one thing well, and helps its wearers do the same. One of the points on the Kickstarter campaign page is “Multitasking drops an average man’s IQ by 15 points.”

It’s set to retail for up to $550 post-campaign, but Calendar Watch is an attractive alternative to devices with more functional features in the same price bracket, at the sub-$300 price points offered as campaign rewards. Backers will get their Calendar Watches in September, 2016. You can read more here about the Calendar Watch Kickstarter campaign.

Editors' Recommendations

Aliya Barnwell
Former Digital Trends Contributor
Aliya Tyus-Barnwell is a writer, cyclist and gamer with an interest in technology. Also a fantasy fan, she's had fiction…
Your Samsung Galaxy Watch is getting new AI health features
Samsung Galaxy Watch 6 and Watch 6 Classic, in black and silver.

Samsung has already put AI into your Galaxy smartphone, and its next move is to put it inside your Galaxy smartwatch too. The company will introduce Galaxy AI features to the Galaxy Watch range with the One UI 6 Watch update coming in the near future. The benefits all center around health and fitness.

Galaxy AI on wearables will also be part of the Samsung Health app, which is used to keep track of your health, fitness, sleep, and daily activity. What features will it include? At this stage, the company has detailed six key advancements using Galaxy AI in Samsung Health and One UI 6 Watch.

Read more
Your next smartwatch could analyze sweat to mine invaluable health data
Smartwatch with sweat analysis capability.

Over the past few years, scientists have been eyeing sweat as the next breakthrough avenue for wearable devices. So far, the tech hasn’t seen commercialization from the likes of Apple or Samsung, but the work continues. The latest device is a “sweat sensor smartwatch” that is capable of continuous sweat analysis to identify the chemicals in human sweat.

The smartwatch in question — developed by a team at the Institute of Solid State Physics at the Hefei Institutes of Physical Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences — can accurately measure the concentration of crucial ions like potassium, sodium, and calcium. Notably, the watch is not only capable of reliable long-term analysis, but also real-time evaluation of aforementioned ions.
Why sweat analysis is important

Read more
Razer Anzu smart glasses deal knocks $140 off the price tag
The Razer Anzu smart glasses placed on top of an open book.

While smartwatch deals have slowly claimed their place in the mainstream, smart glasses haven't turned out to be as popular. Gaming-focused brand Razer, however, is trying to renew interest in smart glasses with the Razer Anzu, which you can currently purchase from Best Buy at $140 off. If you'd like to give them a try, they're available for just $60, less than half their original price of $200.

There have been failures like the Google Glass and Snap Spectacles, and hopeful attempts like Oppo's Air Glass and Apple's secretive project, but the Razer Anzu smart glasses take a different spin on the wearable device by designing them for indoors. While they come with polarized sunglass lenses, their clear lenses are more useful with their blue light filter, which protects your eyes from screen glare to prevent discomfort even after hours of playing video games or working from home. The smart glasses, which also have a built-in omnidirectional microphone and speakers, may also be more comfortable to wear for an extended period of time compared to headsets and headphones. You'll enjoy smooth, stutter-free sound with the Razer Anzu's low latency audio with a 60ms Bluetooth connection.

Read more