Monoprice just unleashed a bundle of new 3D printers – and one is just $150

mono price 3d printing ces 2017 monoprice printer
Online retailer Monoprice announced on January 5 at CES that it was expanding its popular 3D printing lineup with several new printer models that target both home and professional users. The new printers run the gamut and include an upgraded version of the firm’s $199 Select Mini printer and the company’s first professional stereolithography (SLA) printer.

Known for its affordable and high quality computer accessories, Monoprice is a recent entrant to the 3D printer market, and has already seen great success in the field, recording 600-percent sales growth in the category in 2016. The company hopes to continue this trend with two 3D printer models designed for beginning hobby users.

The $149 MP Delta Mini 3D printer, Monoprice’s low-cost, entry-level printer, features Wi-Fi for easy, out-of-the-box printing. Also in the home user category, Monoprice updated its Select Mini printer to version 2.0, adding community-inspired upgrades to the unit.

On the commercial side, Monoprice debuted the MP 3 Series Commercial 3D printer for $799. Ideal for industrial and rapid commercial prototyping, the printer has a full enclosure for printing, a 400 x 400mm build volume, and the latest in FDM technology. The company also entered the SLA resin market with the new MP Maker Prism Professional SLA Resin printer. This $3,500 printer offers professional quality printing at an impressive 0.03-micron layer resolution, making it perfect for prototyping, jewelry, and other projects that require a high level of printing accuracy.

Keeping true to its roots, Monoprice also unveiled a new Onyx Series 3.5 mm audio cable as well as several new USB 3.0 and USB-C cables. Besides its printers, the company is moving beyond the home office market and entering the home appliance category with a new blender, an induction cooktop, and a sous vide precision cooker.

Monoprice will begin offering its new 3D printers, home appliances, and more starting in the first quarter of 2017, and continuing throughout the year.

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