10 tech stories you missed this week: Jeep hacking recall, iTunes sale, and more

top tech stories of the week 7 24 2015 jeep emblem
In the tech world, a lot happens in a week. Too much, in fact, for mere mortals with real lives to keep track of everything. That’s why we’ve compiled a quick and dirty list of the top 10 tech stories from this week. From Grooveshark’s co-founder Josh Greenberg passing away at 28 to cheating site AshleyMadison.com being hacked, and Google announcing it’s shutting down Google+ Photos on August 1, it’s all here.

Grooveshark co-founder Josh Greenberg found dead at 28

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Josh Greenberg / Facebook.com

Josh Greenberg, co-founder of the music streaming service Grooveshark, was found dead in his Florida home on Sunday. He was 28 years old. According to the Gainesville, Florida police department, there was no evidence of foul play or suicide. Josh’s mother Lori Greenberg told The Gainesville Sun that her son was in good health and good spirits: “He was excited about potential new things that he was going to start.”

Read the full story here.

AshleyMadison site hack means your cheating ways could be revealed

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The popular dating site for cheaters AshleyMadison.com was hacked on Sunday by a group claiming to have access to user profiles, usernames, passwords, emails and more. Security expert Brian Krebs first reported that the hackers, who call themselves The Impact Team, published a range of user data they snatched from ALM — which is the parent company behind Ashley Madison, Cougar Life, and Established Me. While the hacker had a problem with AshleyMadison.com, the main issue was with a feature called Full Delete, which was supposed to remove a profile and personal details from the company’s site and servers – for a fee of $19.

Read the full story here.

Google+ Photos shuts down on August 1: Here’s how to save your photos and videos

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Google announced it will shut down its Google+ Photos service, starting on August 1, the company said in a Google+ blog post on Thursday. While the Android version will be the first to be shut down, the iOS and web version will happen soon after. Google is encouraging its users to transition to its new Google Photos service, which allows users to upload unlimited photos for free. Here’s how you can manually upload Google+ Photos to Google Photos.

Read the full story here.

Massive 1.4 million car recall over hacking

Massive 1.4 million car recall over hacking

Like everything else that’s connected to the Internet, new cars are vulnerable to hacking. But when a car is hacked, things can get dangerous, fast. In an article posted on Wired earlier this week, a pair of software engineers demonstrated the ability to hack not only a Jeep’s entertainment system, but also cut the breaks and perform a number of horrible, life-endangering acts. On the same day the article premiered, July 21, Senators introduced The Security and Privacy in Your Car Act, a bill intended to set up benchmarks and security standards for connected vehicles. But the damage has already been done. FCA, the parent company of Jeep, has issued recalls for 1.4 million Jeep, Dodge, and Chrysler vehicles deemed vulnerable to the hack.

Read the full story here.

Spotify’s Discovery Weekly serves up new tunes tailored just for you

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Jessica Lee Star/ DigitalTrends

Spotify introduced a ton of new features with its latest update, and now it’s looking to help discover new music. Among them is a new tool called Discover Weekly, which builds a playlist based on your listening history and the tastes of people who like the same genres and artists as you. The new feature appears at the top of Spotify’s playlist tab on both mobile apps and the Web. The feature highlights new releases, making sure you get access to albums and artists you haven’t listened to before.

Read the full story here.

Facebook gets taste of its own medicine, forced to hand over user information to court

Facebook gets taste of its own medicine, forced to hand over user information to court

Earlier this week, Facebook lost its appeal looking to block some New York search warrants. A ruling by five judges found that the social media giant “does not have the power to ask a judge to throw out search warrants before they have been executed.” Facebook says this decision may force the company to hand over data to the law enforcement officials, which will affect more than 381 users information.

Read the full story here.

Next page: 5 more tech stories you might have missed this week

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